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Group Psychotherapy Column

Tom Treadwell, EdD, T.E.P. C.G.P.
Tom Treadwell, EdD, T.E.P. C.G.P.

Cognitive Experiential Group Therapy: A model for a variety of clinical and college counseling settings

Thomas Treadwell Ed.D., CGP, Deborah Dartnell, MA, MSOD, Ainsley Stenroos, MA, & Brittni Gettys, BA

Cognitive Experiential Group therapy is a powerful tool for growth and change. This model of group therapy is designed to include 10-12 individuals who meet face to face to share their struggles and concerns with 1-2 trained cognitive experiential group therapists. The power lies in the unique opportunity to experience, warming up, action, and sharing in a group environment allowing multiple perspectives, support, encouragement and feedback from other individuals in safe and confidential environment. 

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) was established by Aaron T. Beck (1967, 1979), and involves several techniques to challenge negative thought patterns and increase engagement in positive and success-based experiences. Psychodrama group therapy was created based on work by Jacob. L. Moreno (1953), and involves experiential, interpersonal exercises to raise awareness and reduction of internal conflicts in order to change negative relational patterns. Although CBT is a robust, proven, and very effective treatment approach for many mental disorders, including the big ones like depression and anxiety it is sometimes criticized for being overly structured and intellectually oriented (Young & Klosko, 1994; 1996; Woolfolk, 2000).  As a result, some group therapists today use an approach based upon CBT or identify with a less structured approach called eclectic (Kellerman, 1992) that typically employs techniques that come from cognitive behavioral therapy and its related research.  Beck reports, “My employment of enactive, emotive strategies was influenced, no doubt, by psychodrama and Gestalt therapy” (A. Beck, 1991, p.196). Psychodrama is an eclectic tool to enhance the cognitive and behavioral change. Several practitioners have worked to integrate CBT into the Psychodramatic model by highlighting the ways CBT enhances psychodrama exercises (Boury, Treadwell, & Kumar, 2001, Treadwell, Kumar, & Wright 2004), adapting psychodrama to include the exploration of irrational beliefs (Kipper, 2002), and considering the way in which psychodrama could be considered a form of CBT (Baim, 2007; Fisher, 2007; Treadwell, Travaglini, Reisch, & Kumar, 2011; Wilson, 2009). The blending of the two models yields a complementary approach to multiple problem-solving strategies (Treadwell, Kumar, & Wright 2004):

  • Both the CBT and Psychodrama models stress the discovery process through Socratic questioning. The use of certain structured CBT techniques within the context of psychodrama provide ways to deepen self-reflection, problem-solving, and mood-regulation skills that can be rehearsed through psychodrama exercises.
  • Experiential role playing can provide individuals with opportunities to generate new ways of thinking and behaving. The spontaneity and creativity of individuals can be increased through the use of psychodrama techniques, thus helping to produce alternative thoughts.

Cognitive Experiential Group Therapy (CEGT) is an effective model for working with a variety of clinical and nonclinical populations. The model incorporates cognitive behavioral and psychodrama interventions, allowing group members to identify and modify negative thinking, behavior, and interpersonal patterns while increasing engagement in positive and success-based experiences (Treadwell, Dartnell, Travaglini, Staats & Devinney, 2016). The CEGT environment creates a safe and supportive climate where clients can practice new thinking and behaviors and share their concerns freely with group members (Treadwell, Kumar, & Wright, 2004).

Initially, all members are assessed using various instruments to establish the nature and severity of presenting issues and to uncover other relevant information. The first one or two sessions are devoted to establishing group norms, explaining Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) and schemas, and describing the session format. The initial didactic sessions are intended to explain the group format as a problem-solving approach for working through various interpersonal, occupational, educational, psychological, and health-related conflicts. The sessions include information about the nature of the structured activities so participants have realistic expectations about how the group will run.  Each group member signs informed consent and audiovisual recording consent forms. The audiovisual recordings create an ongoing record of group activities and serve as a source for feedback when needed. The action model is introduced in session one, with the director/facilitator, introducing the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS) (Beck, 1988; Beck& Steer, 1993; Beck, Steer, & Brown, 1996), and explains the importance of completing each scale on a weekly basis. The instruments are administered before the start of each session and are stored in personal folders to serve as an ongoing gauge of participants’ progress within the group (Treadwell, Kumar, & Wright, 2008).

In the second session, additional data on early maladaptive and dysfunctional schemas/core beliefs are obtained when group members complete Young’s (Young, Klosko, & Weishaar, 2003; Young & Klosko, 1994; Young, 1999) schema questionnaire. A list and the definitions of dysfunctional schemas and core beliefs are given to participants during the initial session (Treadwell, Kumar, & Wright, 2008).  Additionally, we administer the Therapeutic Factors Inventory (TFI) to identify four dimensions of group progress (Joyce, MacNair-Semands, Tasca, & Ogrodniczuk, (2011) during week 2, week 8, and week 16.

Each group session in CEGT is divided into three sections typically found in psychodramatic interventions: warm-up; action; and sharing (Moreno, 1934). Many CBT techniques (Beck, 2011) are utilized in the warm-up, including: identifying upsetting situations, automatic negative thoughts and triggered moods; writing balanced thoughts to counter negative automatic thoughts; and recognizing distortions in thinking and imprecise interpretations of difficult situations. The second portion, action, employs psychodramatic techniques such as role-playing, role-reversal, and mirroring, which facilitate the examination of various conflicting situations individuals experience within the group context. This enables group members to better understand the nature of negative thoughts triggered by situations and their effects on moods. The last stage, sharing, allows auxiliaries and group members to share their experiences with the protagonist. At this stage, the director may provide additional guidance to the protagonist regarding ways to begin resolving the actual situation in real life. Normally, the protagonist will be asked to complete a homework assignment that will be reviewed at the next session.

Warm-up

The Automatic Thought Record (ATR) (Greenberger& Padaskey, 1995,2015) is explained and demonstrated on a white board during warm-up.  Socratic questioning is utilized to improve their awareness of irrational thoughts, (negative automatic thinking), that allows them to consciously question their own irrational thoughts.  A group member volunteers his/her situation and facilitators walk the person through the seven columns.  This individual is referred to as the protagonist.

Action

The protagonist, selects a group member, to be her double.  The double communicates thoughts and feelings the protagonist is having but cannot express.  If the protagonist is agitated, she may have some difficulty getting into the psychodrama; in this case, the soliloquy technique would be helpful.  Implementing soliloquy technique, the protagonist walks around the room, thinking aloud, expressing concerns, discomfort, and hopes, allowing her to relax, focus, and prepare for the psychodrama. This is also useful in helping other group members focus on the upcoming action phase. The double walks with her, expressing thoughts he assumes she is thinking but not expressing. Doubling, modeling, and role-training are crucial in learning how to get unstuck from repeated negative behavioral patterns. Many protagonists are anxious when learning a new role; therefore, it is important to support them as they try it “on for size” in session.

Sharing

At the end of the psychodrama, group members share and discuss what occurred, commenting on their experience playing a particular role or on how the situation affected them.  Sharing is critical both for the protagonist and for each of the group members as they reflect, share, and learn from each other. Sharing is a fundamental component in enhancing group cohesion.  During the sharing stage, assigning homework to the protagonist is essential, as it encourages the continuation of work on the new role explored in the session.  Role development needs practice for habituation to take place and to move the protagonist to feel safe in her new role.

Summary

Utilizing principles of CBT and psychodrama create a powerful and effective group process, enabling participants to address problematic situations with the support of group members. Clients find CBT helpful in becoming aware of their habitual dysfunctional thought patterns and belief systems that play an important role in mood regulation; the action component allows them to actually see and feel the dysfunction.  The cognitive experiential approach enables the individual and group to explore events, concerns, or issues, both problematic and fulfilling, in the past, present, or future.

As an aside, we will be offering this as an all-day workshop at the American Group Psychotherapy Association (AGPA) Conference “Connections”, Houston Texas, March – 2018

References

Baim, C. (2007). Are you a cognitive psychodramatist? British Journal of Psychodrama and Sociodrama, 22(2), 23–31

Beck, A.T. (1967). Depression: Clinical, experimental, and theoretical aspects. New York: Hoeber. Republished as Depression: Causes and treatment. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Beck, A.T., Rush, A.J., Shaw, B.F., & Emery, G. (1979). Cognitive therapy of depression. New York: The Guilford Press.

Beck, A. T. (1991). Cognitive therapy as the integrative therapy. Journal of Psychotherapy 

Integration, 1 (3), 191-198.

Beck, J.S. (2011). Cognitive behavioral therapy: Basics and beyond (2nd ed.). New York, NY: The Guilford Press.

Boury, M., Treadwell, T., & Kumar, V. K. (2001). Integrating psychodrama and cognitive therapy: An exploratory study. International Journal of Action Methods: Psychodrama, Skill Training, and Role Playing. 54 (1), pp 13–25.

Fisher, J. (2007). Congenial alliance: Synergies in cognitive and psychodramatic therapies.  Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts. 1 (4), 237-242.

Greenberger, D. &  Padesky, C. (2015). Mind over mood: Change how you feel by changing the way you think. (2nd ed.). New York, NY: The Guilford Press.

Joyce, A.S., MacNair-Semands, R., Tasca, G.A., & Ogrodniczuk, J.S. (2011).  Factor structure and validity of the Therapeutic Factors Inventory – Short Form.  Group Dynamics, 15(3), 201-219.

Moreno, J. L. (1934). Who shall survive? A new approach to the problem of human interrelations. Washington, DC: Nervous & Mental Disease Publishing Co.

Treadwell, T., Kumar, V.K & Wright, J. (2004). Enriching psychodrama via the use of cognitive behavioral therapy techniques. Journal of Group Psychotherapy, Psychodrama, & Sociometry, 55, 55-65.

Treadwell, T., Travaglini, L., Reisch, E., & Kumar, V.K. (2011). The effectiveness of collaborative story building and telling in facilitating group cohesion in a college classroom setting. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 61 (4), 502-517.

Treadwell, T., Dartnell, D., Travaglini L., Staats, M., & Devinney, K. (2016). Group therapy workbook: Integrating cognitive behavioral therapy with psychodramatic theory and practice.  Parker, Colorado: Outskirts Press Publishing.

Wilson, J. (2009). An introduction to psychodrama for CBT practitioners. Journal of the New Zealand College of Clinical Psychologists, 19, 4–7.

Young, J. E., & Klosko, J. S. (1994). Reinventing your life. New York: Plume.

Young, J.E., Klosko, J.S., & Weishaar, M. (2003).  Schema therapy: A practitioner’s guide. New York, NY: The Guilford Press.

Young, J. E. (1999) Cognitive therapy for personality disorders: A schema-focused approach.  Sarasota, FL: Professional Resources Press.

Woolfolk, R. (2000). Cognition and emotion in counseling and psychotherapy. Practical Philosophy.3(3), 19–27.

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Welcome

Editor’s Column

From Your Editors at The Group Psychologist

The past several months witnessed a range of natural disasters, from hurricanes, to earthquakes, to the recent wildfires. Our hearts go out to all those impacted by these events. These disasters are traumatic for those living both near and those connected to the communities who might be living far away. They have a number of long-term consequences on a given community. Yet after each disaster, stories start emerging of neighbors, small groups, and emergency personnel who offer tireless services and come together in service to others. As a famous quote from Fred Rogers (aka Mr. Rogers) highlighted, “When I was a boy and I would see scary things in the news, my mother would say to me, ‘Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping’.”. When we wear our group hats, we notice that he stated the plural, helpers, not the singular, helper. Helpers are often able to do their best work because of their working in a group. Imagine what one lone firefighter is able to do, yet when they are working as a team, the complementarity and synergy from roles and responsibilities allows a much greater response.

We hope this issue of The Group Psychologist lets you see how many of our authors wear their “group hats”. This issue provides a range of thought provoking topics, from reflecting on the dynamics present in an NFL team (sneak preview: “a nice demonstration of why group managers need to balance interpersonal relations with task focus”), to pointing out how group research techniques have caught up to what group practitioners have been seeing (sneak preview: taking into account the impact of the group on the individual), and encouraging Society members to participate in our new Mentoring Program (for questions, contact the mentorship director, Rosamond Smith rosamondjanesmith@gmail.com).

We especially want to highlight this last program, the new Mentoring program developed by the Student Committee. The responsibilities for a mentor are as follows:

  • Provide your mentee an email address or phone number where you can be contacted to answer questions related to professional development (e.g., coursework, future employment, practicum, training experiences, etc.), as needed.
  • Be accessible to have a face-to- face meeting (e.g., lunch, dinner, coffee) with the mentee one to two times per year, such as at APA or convention and/or be available to meet through another means, such as by phone, email or Skype.
  • Assist mentee in networking and meeting with other professionals and/or students in Div. 49 or APA at large. This networking could occur at the Div. 49 social and/or other events.
  • Commit to a one-year mentorship relationship.
  • Refrain from entering into a supervisory relationship with your mentee.
  • Respond to mentee challenges and follow grievance procedures, as appropriate.
  • Maintain Division 49-member status.

We hope you’ll consider becoming a mentee to one of our fabulous students! The application form is here: http://www.apadivisions.org/division-49/membership/mentor-program.aspx.

Tom Treadwell, EdD, T.E.P. C.G.P.
Tom Treadwell, EdD, T.E.P. C.G.P., Editor

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leann Diederich, Ph.D.
Leann Diederich, Ph.D., Associate Editor

 

Categories
Welcome

Editor’s Column

From Your Editors at The Group Psychologist

The role of language, particularly how we use language to teach children about emotions, was recently featured in the New York Times Family section (https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/15/well/family/talking-to-boys-the-way-we-talk-to-girls.html?smid=fb-nytimes). This struck a chord with me when thinking about several adult male clients (ranging from 20s to 50s) that I see for individual therapy, both who I am preparing for going into an interpersonal process group. These clients struggle to express their emotions. We’ve explored what norms and expectations were set by their parents regarding feelings and what’s “appropriate”. Now, as adults, they struggle tremendously with vulnerability; intellectually they know it’s a path towards connection, yet emotionally the fear and aversion to it is immense. Becoming a member of a psychotherapy group is one way I’m hoping they can have new experiences of what it’s like to witness and share their own vulnerabilities. We know group therapy is a way to have corrective emotional experiences, and what are more powerful corrective experiences than those dealing with emotional vulnerability?

Integrating interpersonal process techniques creates a powerful and effective group process enabling participants to address problematic situations with support of group members. Students and clinical populations respond well to the combination and find them helpful in becoming aware of their habitual dysfunctional thought patterns and belief systems that play an important role in mood regulation.  As group members recognize the usefulness of interpersonal process techniques, intimacy and spontaneity tend to increase, creating and supporting a safe space for sharing.

As Brené Brown said, “Owning our story can be hard but not nearly as difficult as spending our lives running from it. Embracing our vulnerabilities is risky but not nearly as dangerous as giving up on love and belonging and joy—the experiences that make us the most vulnerable. Only when we are brave enough to explore the darkness will we discover the infinite power of our light.” So, as we move into the summer months, we challenge you to explore your own darkness. Who can you confide in? What story can you share that hasn’t seen the light of day recently? Who supports you in your path towards opening up to more belonging and joy? Finding friends who can listen empathetically, respond with their own vulnerability, and hold space for emotions that we might have once been taught are “bad”, are precious. Do those friends know what role they play in your life?

I know several of those friends have come from my membership in Division 49. And as we look forward to gathering again at the APA Annual Convention, I’m going to be sure to tell them how important they are to me. We hope you’ll be able to join us in Washington DC in August. Throughout this newsletter you’ll find updates about what to expect and how to best participate.

We look forward to seeing you there!

Tom Treadwell, EdD, T.E.P. C.G.P.
Tom Treadwell, EdD, T.E.P. C.G.P.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Editor

Leann Diederich, Ph.D.
Leann Diederich, Ph.D.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Associate Editor

Categories
Welcome

Editor’s Column

From Your Editors at The Group Psychologist

In this issue of The Group Psychologist you’ll find authors speaking to the powerful roles that groups can have in our lives. While at the recent American Group Psychotherapy Association Annual Meeting, I (Leann) experienced this in many ways. However, one depiction of the power groups have, that caught me off-guard, was while watching the musical Cats. Arguably, one of the most emotional plot lines in the show is that of Grizabella, the old “glamor cat” who is an outcast from the Jellicle tribe of cats. Her anguish at not be accepted, the impact of being shunned, and the loneliness she feels is palpable.  One of the most magical, and at times haunting, songs comes from her singing Memory. Without providing too much of a spoiler, it’s a moving moment in the musical when she is accepted back into the tribe. There is a dark side to groups, their ability to shun, to cut-off, and to wound individuals. Yet, Cats, provides a beautiful visual reminder of the healing power of groups: through acceptance, welcoming, and re-incorporation into something bigger than one’s self.

We encourage you, dear reader, to send us your reactions to the articles in this issue. Better yet, post about them on Facebook! Start out by checking out our President-elect’s recent experiences wondering what attending the Division 49 Mid-Winter Board meeting will be like. Our current President, Dr. Craig Parks, while reflecting on the current state of political discourse takes on the question, “How important is it for opposing groups to be calm and friendly while discussing their differences?”

In a different sort of response to the current political state, in his Group Psychotherapy Column, Dr. Tevya Zukor, points out, “We have the training and experience to understand the dynamics of scapegoating, oppression, and irrational fear-based behavior. Not only do we understand how these processes emerge, but we have thousands of years of combined experience helping people navigate through the worst times of their lives and being there as they to emerge from the darkness that once overwhelmed them.”

Finally, we encourage you to check out the range of awards described in the Diversity Column. These include cash awards of $500 and $1000 for members (or those whose membership is pending) of Division 49. These awards are to “recognize excellence in group psychology practice, research, service, and/or advocacy with a focus on promoting understanding and respect for diversity.” It’s not too early to start thinking about the APA annual convention. The Diversity Committee is hoping to use the Suite to foster dialogue among Division members about diversity in group psychology and group psychotherapy in an informal setting. Please email Dr. Joe Miles (joemiles@utk.edu) if you have ideas or requests about what could be offered.

Tom Treadwell, EdD, T.E.P. C.G.P.
Tom Treadwell, Ed.D., T.E.P. C.G.P.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Editor

Leann Diederich, Ph.D.
Leann Diederich, Ph.D.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Associate Editor

Categories
Welcome

Editor’s Column

Autumn is upon us in the Northern Hemisphere, and winter beckons around the corner. For some, this might mean the relief that rain brings to the parched earth. For others, it means frost on the leaves, brilliant colors on the hillsides, and crisp night air. Whatever it brings for you, we hope that you take a few moments to contemplate the changes that this season brings for you.

This issue of TGP brings some change as well. It’s with a heavy heart as we reflect on Dr. Robert Gleave’s column. He is stepping down from the role of President-elect due to his health concerns. Robert, we value all that you have done for the group psychotherapy field, we admire your quiet strength and depth of spirit, and we appreciate the perspective you articulated in your column, “My predominant feeling is a willingness to learn these next lessons and a sense of peace.” May you continue to find that peace.

Another change to this issue of TGP is the introduction to a new column, Notes from the North. We’ll be featuring a “pen-pal” like relationship with CGPA: Group Therapy, Group Training, Group Facilitation. If you have questions for our Canadian colleagues, please send them our way!  As a child, I (Leann) had a pen-pal from Iowa. I still remember her specific handwriting, and the way she would dot her “i’s” with small hearts. Ah, life before digital emoji’s! There was always a joy in getting a letter from her in the mail, and then pondering what I was going to write back. Perhaps in 20 years we’ll look back with nostalgia at this first Notes from the North column…and marvel at the relationships it has fostered between Division 49 members and our colleagues up north!

This issue also highlights several award winners that were honored at the recent APA Convention in Denver. Dr. Norsworthy was given the Diversity Award and Dr. Maartijn van der Kamp was recognized with the Richard Moreland Dissertation of the Year Award. We encourage you to read about these two individuals in their respective columns. We also wanted to highlight the second Group Psychotherapy Column by Dr. Tevya Zukor. He tackles an especially important topic, how group members need to remember the value of civility and kindness with each other, even when they see actions that might not match their personal values.

And finally, we’ll close with encouraging you to check out Dr. Craig Parks’ President’s Column. He provides an analysis of several movies with group dynamics or group psychotherapy content…and encourages the reader to check out psychmovies.com, as a repository for movies that incorporate psychological content. I, for one, have already checked out the list and am adding a few of the movies to my Netflix queue. The next rainy and windy afternoon, that might be just what the doctor ordered!

Happy Autumn!

Editor

Tom Treadwell, EdD, T.E.P. C.G.P.
Tom Treadwell, EdD, T.E.P. C.G.P.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Associate Editor

Leann Diederich, Ph.D.
Leann Diederich, Ph.D.

 

 

Categories
Welcome

Editor’s Column

It’s summer time! For many professionals at a university or college setting, that means more time out of the classroom, laboratory, committee meetings, counseling center, grant writing and so-forth. How are you going to spend that time? What new activities are you going to undertake? If you don’t have a shift in your work schedule, how can you take advantage of longer daylight hours (for those of us in the Northern Hemisphere)?

For me (Leann), one of my goals this summer was to try something new and (hopefully) fulfilling. While my first idea (sponsoring a local student in training a wild mustang to enter into a regional competition) didn’t materialize due to a number of complicating factors, I decided to try something artistic. I contacted a local artist and scheduled a one-on-one workshop in nuno felting. The process involves working wool fibers into fabric, in my case, a silk scarf. I rarely consider myself artistic, but I do love color! And working with soft and whimsical fibers for a day was a special treat. It became a grounding experience where I was immersed in the moment, choosing how to lay the wool fiber, what shape I wanted to create, and let me tap into a creative side I rarely get to experience in such a tangible way. Being able to approach the project, which presented a number of brand new experiences, was also a treat. How often do we let ourselves do something new, something we aren’t experienced at, and still find it rewarding? Being a beginner is humbling and a great time to practice some self-compassion. While my finished scarf isn’t the beautiful masterpiece I might have hoped for, it’s still beautiful. And it’s symbolic, both of the Southern California kelp forests that were my inspiration for it, but also of the possibilities that new experiences can hold. As I start my next project, a nuno felted scarf done without the mentorship of my new teacher, I’m excited to see what I’ll learn.

In this issue of The Group Psychologist you’ll read about what inspires some of our leaders. In the President’s column by Dr. Craig Parks, you can learn of his goal of creating an annual meeting where leaders in the field of group psychology can come together with professionals in industry and government organizations. We are looking forward to learning more about how this could become a real meeting! And in the column by Dr. Robert Gleave (our President-elect) you can read how his dedication to service has influenced and enriched him over the years.

As you pursue the articles in this issue, if you find one you like, be sure to comment, send it via email to a colleague, or “like” it on Facebook.

Articles or brief reports and news items can be e-mailed directly to Tom, Letitia, and Leann at ttreadwe@mail.med.upenn.edu, as can Letters to the Editor.

PS. If you have children and are looking for some new ideas to do with them this summer, check out: https://www.care.com/a/101-fun-things-to-do-with-kids-this-summer-1305030150

Tom Treadwell, EdD, T.E.P. C.G.P.
Tom Treadwell, EdD, T.E.P. C.G.P.

Editor

Leann Diederich, Ph.D.
Leann Diederich, Ph.D.

Associate Editor

Letitia Travaglini, MA
Letitia Travaglini, MA
Categories
Welcome

Editor’s Column

As I was driving through a nearby town recently, I saw a billboard that caught my eye. It featured three pairs of muddy boots, with the quote “You’ll need these, it’s election time”. While it made me chuckle (with an accompanying grimace for the truth it reflected in this season’s election), it also made me curious. Is “mudslinging” a more recent occurrence in our electoral history?

When I consulted our modern encyclopedia (Wikipedia, of course!) I found the following definition of mudslinging, “trying to win an advantage by referring to negative aspects of an opponent rather than emphasizing one’s own positive attributes or preferred policies” (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Negative_campaigning). Colloquially known as “mudslinging”, an early example of negative campaigning comes from the presidential election of 1828. In the race between Andrew Jackson and the incumbent President John Adams, numerous negative campaigning tactics were used, including attacking Jackson’s marriage and his propensity for dueling! Contrary to my idealistic perspective of our history, apparently mudslinging has a long legacy in our elections.

Fortunately, we are part of an organization whose candidates don’t need to resort to negative campaigning. As you’ll read in this issue, it’s election time for the Society, as we are looking for a President-elect, Secretary, Member-at-Large, Student Representative, and Council Representative. Each nominee for these positions has prepared a brief candidate statement so you can learn a bit more about who they are. We urge you to become an educated voter by investigating the candidates, and if you have questions, please reach out to them to get more details about their visions for participating in the leadership for our Society.

Also in this issue, you can learn more about Scholarships for students to attend the Annual Convention in Denver, CO, E-mail application materials to rosamondjanesmith@gmail.com and a Virtual Learning Hour hosted by the Early Career Psychologist Task Force on Women in Leadership. Please RSVP for access to div49group@gmail.com.

If you like one of the articles you read, be sure to comment, send it via email to a colleague, or “like” it on Facebook.

Articles or brief reports and news items can be e-mailed directly to Tom, Letitia, and Leann at ttreadwe@mail.med.upenn.edu, as can Letters to the Editor.

Tom Treadwell, EdD, T.E.P. C.G.P.
Tom Treadwell, EdD, T.E.P. C.G.P.

Editor

Leann Diederich, Ph.D.
Leann Diederich, Ph.D.

Associate Editor

Letitia Travaglini, MA
Letitia Travaglini, MA
Categories
Welcome

Editor’s Column

It was nice seeing many of you at the APA Annual Convention. We had an extremely successful gathering and a great deal of work was accomplished. We were especially pleased to learn of the Society’s commitment to providing awards in a number of different areas. This is based on the success of the Division 49 Foundation and numerous leaders who worked dedicatedly over the years. You can read more about this in Dr. Keim’s article in this issue.

In addition to the awards that the Foundation will offering (including a Group Psychology Award and a travel award for professional development), the Board also committed to funding awards recognizing excellence in teaching group dynamics, outstanding departmental training in group, and outstanding commitment to the practice of group psychotherapy.

In this issue, you can read about the following:

  • A more detailed analysis of what group training opportunities are available in graduate programs. Erin Crozier and Samuel Collier further analyzed the data from the survey reported in an earlier TGP article (http://div49tgp.com/2014/10/30/group-training-survey-may-2014/).
  • We also hear from President Kivlighan, who asks, “Are we the Division of Group Psychology AND Group Psychotherapy or are we the Division of Group Psychology OR Group Psychotherapy? I think that we have work to do to make sure that we are the Division of Group Psychology AND Group Psychotherapy.” We think this is an especially important conversation, so we encourage you to check out his column.
  • In the column from President-elect Parks, he quotes Steve Wozniak: “I’m going to give you some advice that might be hard to take. That advice is: Work alone. Not on a committee. Not on a team.” There are thus some tasks that can be completed just fine by a single, motivated person. We don’t need groups to do everything. In his last column he talked about an interest in offering workshops on group-related phenomena. His focus seems to lean toward talking with the health and business and education practitioners about the many situations for which we know, empirically, that collective effort is preferable to individual effort. We are glad these varying perspectives can all be housed within our Society.

If you like one of the articles you read, be sure to comment, send it via email to a colleague, or “like” it on Facebook.

Articles or brief reports and news items can be e-mailed directly to Tom, Letitia, and Leann at ttreadwe@mail.med.upenn.edu, as can Letters to the Editor.

Tom Treadwell, EdD, T.E.P. C.G.P.
Tom Treadwell, EdD, T.E.P. C.G.P.

Editor

Leann Diederich, Ph.D.
Leann Diederich, Ph.D.

Associate Editor

Categories
Welcome

Editor’s Column

As we slowly work our way toward summer we look forward to joining and sharing our knowledge at our Annual Convention this August. Division 49’s program is very exciting as one can review in this issue.

In this issue, you can read about the following:

  • President Dennis Kivlighan focuses on Division 49’s program. We share his enthusiasm for the invited address by Dr. Molyn Leszcz. You can also learn more about the creation of a new ritual, The Annual Division 49 Fellow’s Talks, in his column.
  • President-elect Craig Parks plans to focus on connecting and furthering the group experience through collaboration with fellow group workers (i.e., organizational, clinical, and sports group psychologists). He feels that Division 49 needs to initiate extension efforts. For example, he suggests that the Division could sponsor workshops on topics related to group functioning to which professionals and budding professionals can attend at reasonable rates. We applaud his goal of building stronger connection between group psychology and group psychotherapy.
  • An update on the status of a new Division 49 journal. The Board received feedback from the APA Publications and Communication Board, and we report on that feedback in a separate column.

This issue has links to individual articles, tabs across top of pages (for current issue, past issues, guidelines or instructions to authors, link to website, about TGP/the Division, how to join the division, and a link to Facebook). Other features include a photo gallery, a way to sign-up to follow the site (e.g., get emails when it’s updated), a search feature, archives by month, and categories (types of articles) and tags (descriptors). If you like one of the articles you read, be sure to comment, send it via email to a colleague, or “like” it on Facebook.

Articles or brief reports and news items can be e-mailed directly to Tom, Letitia, and Leann at ttreadwe@mail.med.upenn.edu, as can Letters to the Editor.

Tom Treadwell, Ed.D., T.E.P, CGP
Tom Treadwell, Ed.D., T.E.P, CGP

Editor

Leann Diederich, Ph.D.
Leann Diederich, Ph.D.

Associate Editor

Categories
News

New Journal Update

Tom Treadwell, EdD, T.E.P. C.G.P.
Tom Treadwell, EdD, T.E.P. C.G.P.

A proposal for a second journal for Division 49, Group Psychology and Group Psychotherapy, was presented at the Board’s August 2015 meeting in Washington, D.C.

APA’s Publications & Communications (PC) Board is recommending against the establishment of a new clinical journal for Division 49 as reported by Gary Vanderbos.

According to Vanderbos, “the primary basis for this recommendation is the simple numbers and finances. We believe the Division is too small to economically support two journals—with readers, with authors, and with supporting dollars. Moreover, on a percentage of clinical hours provided per year, group psychotherapy is not a highly frequent method of delivery of psychotherapy, even taking a multi-disciplinary approach to data.  There simply may not be enough willing authors and eager readers to support another clinical group psychotherapy journal beyond those already in existence.”

However, Vanderbos states, “We believe the motivation behind the proposal has a degree of merit. I have been kicking around some ideas about that, which is the real focus of what I would like to chat with the Executive Committee about. Rather than forming a new journal, I think the Division should strike an ‘alliance’ of sorts with another Division, which has a more clinically-oriented journal.”

However, Vanderbos suggests a meeting time is to be arranged to discuss the totality of the situation with the Executive Committee of the Division at the Toronto APA Convention. We could do this during the Group Dynamics journal meeting, which is already scheduled for Thursday, 6 August, at 11 am at the APA Publications Suite.

Vanderbos suggests collaborating with other divisions, such as, Division 42 whereby they are establishing a new journal called Practice Innovations, as they will need submissions and content to publish, or perhaps Division 29 since they publish more clinically-oriented articles on the “art” of doing psychotherapy.

We need to make Division 49’s mission one that promotes the clinical component(s) of group psychology and group psychotherapy via our own division. Burlingame, Strauss, & Joyce (2011) have demonstrated there is now sufficient data showing group therapy is as efficient and or effective as individual therapy.

This note is to solicit reactions from Division 49 membership! The membership reactions to the recommendations are important… Let us know your thoughts.