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Welcome

Candidate Statement: President Elect, Leann Diederich

Leann Diederich, Ph.D.
Leann Diederich, Ph.D.

Groups: comforting, thought provoking, intimidating, powerful, wondrous, and complex. Groups fascinate me. This led to my specialty in groups during graduate school and I have continued a passion for groups in my career. As I’ve transitioned from being a staff psychologist and Group Therapy Coordinator at Pennsylvania State University’s counseling center, to working independently in private practice, groups have remained a specialty of mine.

My knowledge and love for groups has been fostered through my involvement in the Society. In December 2015 I completed a rotation as Member-at-Large on the Board. In my time working with the Board over the past 10 years, I have served as Chair of the Student Committee, Membership Chair, and currently Co-Chair of the Early Career Psychologist Task Force. I am currently the Associate Editor of The Group Psychologist and liaison to APA’s Committee for the Advancement of Professional Practice. As you can see, I’ve worn many hats with the Society and have come to know it well.

Continuing to serve the needs of Early Career Psychologists (ECPs) would be my focus as President-elect. Our Society’s future is in our students and ECPS and those are the connections I want to nurture. Several recent initiatives I have worked on with the ECP Task Force are evidence of this, including our popular conference calls, short-term mentoring groups, and a newly develop Webinar Series that is coming up.

I have a strong passion to serve the Society and the broader field of group psychology and group psychotherapy. My professional home has been firmly housed in the group world since the beginning of my graduate study with Dr. Rex Stockton. I can’t think of a better way to integrate my passion for groups and my dedication to service than through this Society. Please don’t hesitate to contact me if you have any questions or comments about my candidacy for this position, at Leann.Diederich@gmail.com.

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Welcome

Editor’s Column

It was nice seeing many of you at the APA Annual Convention. We had an extremely successful gathering and a great deal of work was accomplished. We were especially pleased to learn of the Society’s commitment to providing awards in a number of different areas. This is based on the success of the Division 49 Foundation and numerous leaders who worked dedicatedly over the years. You can read more about this in Dr. Keim’s article in this issue.

In addition to the awards that the Foundation will offering (including a Group Psychology Award and a travel award for professional development), the Board also committed to funding awards recognizing excellence in teaching group dynamics, outstanding departmental training in group, and outstanding commitment to the practice of group psychotherapy.

In this issue, you can read about the following:

  • A more detailed analysis of what group training opportunities are available in graduate programs. Erin Crozier and Samuel Collier further analyzed the data from the survey reported in an earlier TGP article (http://div49tgp.com/2014/10/30/group-training-survey-may-2014/).
  • We also hear from President Kivlighan, who asks, “Are we the Division of Group Psychology AND Group Psychotherapy or are we the Division of Group Psychology OR Group Psychotherapy? I think that we have work to do to make sure that we are the Division of Group Psychology AND Group Psychotherapy.” We think this is an especially important conversation, so we encourage you to check out his column.
  • In the column from President-elect Parks, he quotes Steve Wozniak: “I’m going to give you some advice that might be hard to take. That advice is: Work alone. Not on a committee. Not on a team.” There are thus some tasks that can be completed just fine by a single, motivated person. We don’t need groups to do everything. In his last column he talked about an interest in offering workshops on group-related phenomena. His focus seems to lean toward talking with the health and business and education practitioners about the many situations for which we know, empirically, that collective effort is preferable to individual effort. We are glad these varying perspectives can all be housed within our Society.

If you like one of the articles you read, be sure to comment, send it via email to a colleague, or “like” it on Facebook.

Articles or brief reports and news items can be e-mailed directly to Tom, Letitia, and Leann at ttreadwe@mail.med.upenn.edu, as can Letters to the Editor.

Tom Treadwell, EdD, T.E.P. C.G.P.
Tom Treadwell, EdD, T.E.P. C.G.P.

Editor

Leann Diederich, Ph.D.
Leann Diederich, Ph.D.

Associate Editor

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Columns

Early Career Group Psychologist Column

Awards, Webinars, and New Members…Oh My

We wanted to take this time to update our membership with some of the recent highlights of activities from the Early Career Psychologist’s Task Force.

Awards

The ECP Task Force worked to create criteria and standards for a new Group Psychotherapy Practice award the Society will offer in 2016. The award will be given to recognize outstanding commitment to the practice of group psychotherapy. Our intention is to reach a broad audience, so any individual, agency, or organization that provides exemplary group services to the community will be eligible. Stay tuned for an announcement on the listserv about how to nominate a recipient for this award.

Webinars

The ECP Task Force is going to continue its tradition of providing free conference calls to anyone (not just Society members). But in 2016 stay tuned for a new addition….webinars! We are hoping to host webinars in February 2016 and September 2016, with conference calls in November 2015 and June 2016. In addition, there are plans in the works for a special series of webinars focus on research techniques for group research in 2016 as well. Good things, they are a comin’ in 2016!

New Members

Finally, we’d like to welcome two new members to our ECP Task Force, Drs. Elina Kanellopou and Barbara Greenspan. Dr. Janellopou lives in Athens, Greece and received her degree in psychology from Columbia University. She is post-doctoral fellow at the University of Athens School of Medicine and Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Unit of Sismanoglio General Hospital in addition to working in a private practice. In her personal life, she has a passion for performing arts, yoga, singing and dancing. We’ll be introducing Dr. Greenspan in a future column, so stay tuned for that.

Misha Bogomaz, Psy.D., CGP
Misha Bogomaz, Psy.D., CGP

ECP Task Force Co-Chair 

Leann Diederich, Ph.D.
Leann Diederich, Ph.D.

ECP Task Force Co-Chair 

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Committee Reports

Committee for the Advancement of Professional Practice

Leann Diederich, Ph.D.
Leann Diederich, Ph.D.

The Society of Group Psychology and Group Psychotherapy have sent a liaison (Dr. Leann Diederich) to the recent two CAPP board meetings in Washington, DC. Below is a summary of highlights that might be relevant to Society members, followed by formal meeting highlights submitted by CAPP from the May 2015 meeting.

Meeting Highlights by Dr. Diederich

  • Dr. Katherine Nordal recently spoke at the Society of Psychologists in Management Conference. The next meeting is February 24-28, 2016 in Atlanta, GA. If any group psychologists with expertise in group dynamics and management want to present, this might be a good audience to lend our expertise to. (For more information: http://www.spim.org/conference.shtml).
  • The staff from the Government Relations office of APAPO spoke about their work on behalf of practicing psychologists. This includes advocacy leading to the repeal of the sustainable growth rate (SGR) as well as their continued work to include psychologists listed as physicians in the Medicare definition. Given the anticipated 1.5% decrease in Medicare payments over the next 5 years, they still have a lot of work to do. They continue to work with Representative Tim Murphy (a psychologist) on his Seriously Mentally Ill bill, along with getting his support on changes APAPO advocates for.
  • Legal and Regulatory Affairs (LRA) continues to do some impressive work on behalf of psychologists. For instance, they challenged the Missouri Medicaid Agency which was trying to impose additional and unprecedented training requirements on psychologists who provide services falling under the Health Behavior and Assessment Intervention Codes (also known as H&B codes), including those for group (code 96153). They also worked with Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield (BCBS) and other BCBS companies on risk adjustments audits, which they expect to increase when they are required in November 2015 (due to the Affordable Care Act).
  • LRA also asked that if any psychologist learns that clients can’t find a therapist in-network in their area, please let LRA know. They highlighted how provider reimbursement rates drive patient access to care. So if they can point to instances where providers are not available (potentially because of low reimbursement rates) then this helps their advocacy cause.
  • The State Leadership Conference Workgroup proposed a number of changes. A change that was considered, but was ultimately rejected, was for Presidents from Divisions that have Federal Advocacy Coordinators to not be invited. Fortunately, this was rejected and we will continue to be invited due to the benefits outweighing the costs.
  • There was continued discussion around the Council’s “Psychologists in Integrated Primary Care and Specialty Health Settings” item. If you are a group psychologist working in integrated primary care settings, please let us know! We’d love to have you offer some tips to other Society members about how to get involved in this growing field. Please email us at Div49group@gmail.com if you’d be willing to write an article in a future TGP or provide us with tips we can post on our Facebook page.
  • Two other large topics continue to be addressed by the CAPP Board; these include working on the Master’s Degree in Psychology and addressing the scope of practice of psychologists. On the latter of these, a Specialties Summit is being convened between the Council of Specialties, the American Board of Professional Psychology (ABPP), and the Association of State and Provincial Psychology Boards (ASPPB). For more details on these topics please read more in the summary provided by CAPP, below.
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Columns

Early Career Group Psychologist Column: Group Mentoring Program

Leann Diederich, Ph.D.
Leann Diederich, Ph.D.

We are happy to announce that we are piloting a new program, exclusively for Society of Group Psychology and Group Psychotherapy members. We are offering short-term group mentoring with well-known group psychologists. Our first mentor is our newly elected President-Elect, Dr. Robert Gleave.

Dr. Gleave (ABPP, CGP) is a Psychologist and Clinical Professor at Brigham Young University. He has a joint appointment with Counseling and Psychological Services and the Counseling Psychology Doctoral Program. He teaches third year practicum and advanced group theory and practice and leads two groups weekly. He is a member of the Consortium for Group Research and Practice (C-GRP) research team which is a collaborative effort between the Clinical Psychology program, the Counseling Psychology program, the Counseling Center, and the Utah State Hospital. The Consortium is involved in multiple research projects investigating group psychotherapy process and outcome.  He also maintains a small private practice that includes two groups.

Details of the Group

  1. The group will meet for 6 sessions, every other week starting on Wednesday, July 1st at 1 pm (EDT), 11 am (MDT), 10 am (PDT) and will be for 50 minutes.
  2. You must be able to attend at least 4 of the 6 mentoring sessions (July 1, July 15, July 29, August 12, August 26, and September 9).
  3. We will be using video conferencing technology, such as Zoom. You need broadband wired or wireless internet, speakers/microphone, and a webcam. You’ll need to be able to download the Zoom meeting plug-in to access the group.
  4. A group of 6 mentees will be selected from the first responses back to us (email us at div49group@gmail.com).
  5. Only Division 49 members are eligible. If you want to become a member, go to: http://www.apadivisions.org/division-49/membership/index.aspx.
  6. Topics for discussion will grow out of the interests of the mentees.

If you have any questions, please contact Membership Chair, Dr. Leann Diederich (div49group@gmail.com).

As of this publication, the mentoring group is filling fast. Perhaps additional mentoring groups can be developed for future group psychologists.

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Columns

Early Career Group Psychologist Column: Tips for Salary Negotiation

Leann Diederich, Ph.D.
Leann Diederich, Ph.D.

On May 28, 2015 the Early Career Psychologist Task Force hosted a free conference call on negotiating salaries. We had over 40 participants on the call and featured guest Dr. Andy King, the Director of the University of North Florida. Thank you Dr. King!

The following tips were sharing during the call:

  • Don’t bring up the discussion of the salary too early in the interview process. The best case one can expect is your potential employer will bring it up. You do not want them to think you are only in it for the money.
  • Even during the phone interview is too early. Typically the job description will list a range, but if it doesn’t, you can call the Human Resources department to find out.
  • If a salary is listed as “negotiable”, then it’s typically only in a 2% to 5% range.
  • Consider other professional benefits beyond just a salary. Include: retirement benefits, health insurance, access to exercise facilities, loan forgiveness possibilities, funding to attend conferences or professional development opportunities, and even state income taxes (i.e., they vary across states).
  • If you are offered a salary that is too low for you, but the employer says they can’t raise it, you can reply, “That could be acceptable, if some other arrangements could be made.” Then you can consider some of the other benefits besides salary listed above.
  • If you need supervision to get licensed, consider whether the agency will pay for that directly, or will it need to come out of your salary (and you’d have to pay taxes on it first).
  • If you have to ask about the salary, consider framing it in terms of “In ballpark figures, what can one expect, generally speaking from this type of position?” or “What would someone need to earn to live comfortably in this community?”
  • Ultimately, you are in a much better negotiating position if you are the agency or center’s top choice. Thus, focus on this throughout the interview process.
  • If you are already in a position and want to work on getting a raise, there are a couple of considerations. First, consider taking on more responsibilities or a coordinator role. This can help you advocate for a higher salary increase by demonstrating how you are committed to the agency and to the mission. Second, if you are aware of new hires that have less experience than you, but are being paid a higher rate, work with your Director or even the Human Resource department who can work on avoiding “salary compression”. Finally, your Director or employer can advocate for a “special pay increase” if all psychologists at an agency are underpaid compared to national or state norms.

For additional tips, check out the free article, Women at the Bargaining Table: Pitfalls and Prospects (http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1397699).

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Welcome

Editor’s Column

As we slowly work our way toward summer we look forward to joining and sharing our knowledge at our Annual Convention this August. Division 49’s program is very exciting as one can review in this issue.

In this issue, you can read about the following:

  • President Dennis Kivlighan focuses on Division 49’s program. We share his enthusiasm for the invited address by Dr. Molyn Leszcz. You can also learn more about the creation of a new ritual, The Annual Division 49 Fellow’s Talks, in his column.
  • President-elect Craig Parks plans to focus on connecting and furthering the group experience through collaboration with fellow group workers (i.e., organizational, clinical, and sports group psychologists). He feels that Division 49 needs to initiate extension efforts. For example, he suggests that the Division could sponsor workshops on topics related to group functioning to which professionals and budding professionals can attend at reasonable rates. We applaud his goal of building stronger connection between group psychology and group psychotherapy.
  • An update on the status of a new Division 49 journal. The Board received feedback from the APA Publications and Communication Board, and we report on that feedback in a separate column.

This issue has links to individual articles, tabs across top of pages (for current issue, past issues, guidelines or instructions to authors, link to website, about TGP/the Division, how to join the division, and a link to Facebook). Other features include a photo gallery, a way to sign-up to follow the site (e.g., get emails when it’s updated), a search feature, archives by month, and categories (types of articles) and tags (descriptors). If you like one of the articles you read, be sure to comment, send it via email to a colleague, or “like” it on Facebook.

Articles or brief reports and news items can be e-mailed directly to Tom, Letitia, and Leann at ttreadwe@mail.med.upenn.edu, as can Letters to the Editor.

Tom Treadwell, Ed.D., T.E.P, CGP
Tom Treadwell, Ed.D., T.E.P, CGP

Editor

Leann Diederich, Ph.D.
Leann Diederich, Ph.D.

Associate Editor

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Announcements

“The Group Psychologist” Satisfaction Survey Results

Leann Diederich, Ph.D.
Leann Diederich, Ph.D.

As your Associate Editor for The Group Psychologist, I want to thank those of you who participated in our satisfaction survey from the fall. We received 41 responses and appreciated the feedback. We wanted to take the time to summarize some of the highlights from the quantitative and qualitative results. For more details on the results, please email me directly (Leann.Diederich@gmail.com).

Here’s a quick snapshot of some of the results:

  • 90% of the respondents ranged from being satisfied to very satisfied with the overall newsletter.
  • The top sections that respondents found to be the most important to them were the news (#1), brief articles (#2), and the various columns (#3).
  • The sections with the highest levels of satisfaction were the President’s column, President-elect column, and the Editor’s column (all tied for first).
  • With regards to the TGP contributing to the respondent’s practice, research, or teaching, 57% thought it contributed, 30% didn’t think it contributed, and 13% were undecided.
  • Most respondents read 4 or fewer articles each newsletter, with only 18% reading 5 or more.

Several themes emerged from the qualitative results. Multiple respondents wanted a better balance of theory and research, in addition to the practice and clinical materials that are currently focused on. However, others wanted more clinical material! Overall, it seems the TGP could reflect other types of groups, not just psychotherapy groups. As your editors, we are always open to suggestions for authors to contact to help us bring this type of focus to the TGP. Others praised the TGP, giving feedback like: “The articles are very relevant and helpful. Enjoy keeping up with latest developments in our division”.

The respondents to the survey mirrored our typical member (e.g., late-career psychologist) with 59% of participants identifying as a late-career psychologist. Mid-career and early-career psychologists made up 20% of respondents.

While not all of the feedback can be reflected in this article, we will use all of it to help us tailor future editions of the newsletter. If you didn’t get a chance to participate, and want to send us feedback, please feel email us! I

 

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Columns

Editors Column

Spring has finally come! For many of us on the East Coast it has been [and still is] a long hard winter. The glimpses of new growth, birds singing, and warmer days are always a special treat this time of year. What elements of spring do you appreciate?

With this new season, we also have an opportunity to reflect on what keeps us connected and grounded. In his column, President Dennis Kivlighan highlights the roles that social rituals have for him, both personally and potentially for Division 49. President-elect Craig Parks plans on connecting and furthering the group experience through collaboration with fellow group workers, such as organizational, clinical, and sports group psychologists.

Spring is also a time of change, which is present in Division 49 as well. In this issue you can read about the nominees for the President and Member-at-Large. We hope you will take the time to learn more about these wonderful members who want to step into leadership positions. And be sure to cast your vote when ballots are sent out!

Since we have moved to an electronic format (this is our first anniversary year) we are in the process of collecting and analyzing information from membership regarding the friendliness of our new format. See Leann Diederich’s summary in this issue on the results of The Group Psychologist satisfaction survey. Eyeballing early career psychologists data we see this group is busy with entering the workplace or in many cases, internships, and not having time to read the newsletter (or at least not participating in our survey to tell us they are!).

This issue has links to individual articles, tabs across top of pages (for current issue, past issues, guidelines or instructions to authors, link to website, about TGP/the Division, how to join the division, and a link to Facebook ). Other features include a photo gallery, a way to sign-up to follow the site (e.g., get emails when it’s updated), a search feature, archives by month, and categories (types of articles) and tags (descriptors). If you like one of the articles you read, be sure to comment, send it via email to a colleague, or “like” it on Facebook.

We encourage your feedback regarding this electronic format and want you to share your thoughts with us.

Articles or brief reports and news items can be e-mailed directly to Tom, Letitia, and Leann at ttreadwe@mail.med.upenn.edu, as can Letters to the Editor.

Tom Treadwell, Ed.D., T.E.P, CGP
Tom Treadwell, Ed.D., T.E.P, CGP

Tom Treadwell, Ed.D. C.G.P. T.E.P

Editor

Leann Diederich, Ph.D.
Leann Diederich, Ph.D.

Leann Terry Diederich, Ph.D.

Associate Editor

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Committee Reports

Membership Committee Report

Leann Diederich, Ph.D.
Leann Diederich, Ph.D.

Leann T. Diederich, Ph.D., Membership Chair

APA recently released the demographic characteristics for all Divisions for the 2014 membership year, so I wanted to take an opportunity to let you know a bit about who we, as a group of almost four hundred Division 49 members, are.

Across all types of Division members (e.g., associate, fellows, members) we are 61% men and 38% women. We are predominately White (78%), with 16% unspecified in race, and less than 3% Black and Hispanic, and less than 1% Asian or multiracial. As has been true for a number of years, 71% of all members are over the age of 60, with the mean age of 66 years old. However, 11% of members in 2014 were early-career psychologists (ECPs). Most of us live in the Middle Atlantic (26%), followed by the South Atlantic (18%), and the Pacific region (15%).

While we all share a common bond of a love of group, in what ever form, most of us are in the health service provider subfield (71%; including clinical and counseling psychology), with 10% in other fields such as counselor education, 6% in research, and 8% with a “science designation”. Members identified their primary work settings including 38% in independent practice, 26% in university or four year colleges, and 12% of all members working in a hospital. However, when members are asked to identify their work activities, you can see a more representative split between the founding traditions of our Division (research, practice, and education). Sixty-seven members selected research as one of their work activities, 95 members selected education, and 100 members selected mental health services (note that these choices are not mutually exclusive). However, when members are asked to choose their primary work activity, 47% choose mental health services, 16% choose education, 9% choose management/administration, and only 7% choose research (18% did not specify).

Division 49 members are not exclusive, we also belong to other APA divisions. In fact, 42% belong to four or more other divisions with only 19% belonging to only one division. The divisions with the most overlap in membership to ours, include: Psychotherapy (Division 29; 102 members belong to that division as well), Psychologists in Independent Practice (Division 42; 95 members), Clinical Psychology (Division 12; 75 members), Counseling Psychology (Division 17; 69 members), Psychoanalysis (Division 39; 53 members), Personality and Social (Division 8; 43 members), and Psychology of Women (Division 35; 43 members).

If you are interested in the full data set, check out the Division Profiles: http://www.apa.org/about/division/officers/services/profiles.aspx.