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From your Editors

 

Tom Treadwell, EdD, T.E.P. C.G.P.
Tom Treadwell, EdD, T.E.P. C.G.P.
Leann Diederich, Ph.D.
Leann Diederich, Ph.D.

From Your Editors at The Group Psychologist

Winter can bring on a time for self-reflection. The quietness of the season, the (often) cold night air, and witnessing the dormancy or hibernation state that many natural beings go through, all can prompt introspection. In this issue of The Group Psychologist you’ll find one such introspection in Dr. Tevya Zukor’s column. As he writes, “Maybe the true human condition is learning that we will often feel weak when we view ourselves as just one of many, but we have strength in our groups. It forms the foundation for all of our accomplishments. As long as we identify with the “human” sub-group, we can never be alone – sometimes, we can just feel temporarily disconnected.” We encourage you to read his entire column from this issue (Directions to Neverland).

Winter can also be a time for intense productivity, such as at the recent Mid-Winter Division 49 Board Meeting or at the Committee for the Advancement of Professional Practice (CAPP) Board Meeting. As Dr. Sean Woodland updated us from his recent attendance as a liaison to the CAPP meeting, CAPP is working closely with APA on the new membership model for APA and APAPO (more details can be found here: http://www.apapracticecentral.org/update/2018/02-08/association-structure.aspx). CAPP also is working to take on the complicated topic of master’s level psychological graduates and what licensure and independent practice options should be available to them. Be sure to check out the article summarizing more of what CAPP is focusing on in this issue [Committee for the Advancement of Professional Practice].

Speaking of intense productivity, we want to echo President Georgio Tasca’s appreciation to the work of the Division 49 Board who worked tirelessly on a resubmission of a petition to the Education Directorate of the APA Commission for the Recognition of Specialities and Proficiencies in Professional Psychology (CRSPPP) to have Group Psychology and Group Psychotherapy receive designation as a specialty. While this was a joint effort of your Division, the American Group Psychotherapy Association, the American Board of Group Psychology, the American Academy of Group Psychology, and the International Board of Certification of Group Psychotherapists, we recognize that several Division 49 members have been instrumental in this effort over the years.

So in closing, we hope you take some time this winter season for a range of activities, from quiet introspection all the way to intense productivity (often done in groups).

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Welcome

Editor’s Column

From Your Editors at The Group Psychologist

The past several months witnessed a range of natural disasters, from hurricanes, to earthquakes, to the recent wildfires. Our hearts go out to all those impacted by these events. These disasters are traumatic for those living both near and those connected to the communities who might be living far away. They have a number of long-term consequences on a given community. Yet after each disaster, stories start emerging of neighbors, small groups, and emergency personnel who offer tireless services and come together in service to others. As a famous quote from Fred Rogers (aka Mr. Rogers) highlighted, “When I was a boy and I would see scary things in the news, my mother would say to me, ‘Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping’.”. When we wear our group hats, we notice that he stated the plural, helpers, not the singular, helper. Helpers are often able to do their best work because of their working in a group. Imagine what one lone firefighter is able to do, yet when they are working as a team, the complementarity and synergy from roles and responsibilities allows a much greater response.

We hope this issue of The Group Psychologist lets you see how many of our authors wear their “group hats”. This issue provides a range of thought provoking topics, from reflecting on the dynamics present in an NFL team (sneak preview: “a nice demonstration of why group managers need to balance interpersonal relations with task focus”), to pointing out how group research techniques have caught up to what group practitioners have been seeing (sneak preview: taking into account the impact of the group on the individual), and encouraging Society members to participate in our new Mentoring Program (for questions, contact the mentorship director, Rosamond Smith rosamondjanesmith@gmail.com).

We especially want to highlight this last program, the new Mentoring program developed by the Student Committee. The responsibilities for a mentor are as follows:

  • Provide your mentee an email address or phone number where you can be contacted to answer questions related to professional development (e.g., coursework, future employment, practicum, training experiences, etc.), as needed.
  • Be accessible to have a face-to- face meeting (e.g., lunch, dinner, coffee) with the mentee one to two times per year, such as at APA or convention and/or be available to meet through another means, such as by phone, email or Skype.
  • Assist mentee in networking and meeting with other professionals and/or students in Div. 49 or APA at large. This networking could occur at the Div. 49 social and/or other events.
  • Commit to a one-year mentorship relationship.
  • Refrain from entering into a supervisory relationship with your mentee.
  • Respond to mentee challenges and follow grievance procedures, as appropriate.
  • Maintain Division 49-member status.

We hope you’ll consider becoming a mentee to one of our fabulous students! The application form is here: http://www.apadivisions.org/division-49/membership/mentor-program.aspx.

Tom Treadwell, EdD, T.E.P. C.G.P.
Tom Treadwell, EdD, T.E.P. C.G.P., Editor

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leann Diederich, Ph.D.
Leann Diederich, Ph.D., Associate Editor

 

Categories
Welcome

Editor’s Column

From Your Editors at The Group Psychologist

The role of language, particularly how we use language to teach children about emotions, was recently featured in the New York Times Family section (https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/15/well/family/talking-to-boys-the-way-we-talk-to-girls.html?smid=fb-nytimes). This struck a chord with me when thinking about several adult male clients (ranging from 20s to 50s) that I see for individual therapy, both who I am preparing for going into an interpersonal process group. These clients struggle to express their emotions. We’ve explored what norms and expectations were set by their parents regarding feelings and what’s “appropriate”. Now, as adults, they struggle tremendously with vulnerability; intellectually they know it’s a path towards connection, yet emotionally the fear and aversion to it is immense. Becoming a member of a psychotherapy group is one way I’m hoping they can have new experiences of what it’s like to witness and share their own vulnerabilities. We know group therapy is a way to have corrective emotional experiences, and what are more powerful corrective experiences than those dealing with emotional vulnerability?

Integrating interpersonal process techniques creates a powerful and effective group process enabling participants to address problematic situations with support of group members. Students and clinical populations respond well to the combination and find them helpful in becoming aware of their habitual dysfunctional thought patterns and belief systems that play an important role in mood regulation.  As group members recognize the usefulness of interpersonal process techniques, intimacy and spontaneity tend to increase, creating and supporting a safe space for sharing.

As Brené Brown said, “Owning our story can be hard but not nearly as difficult as spending our lives running from it. Embracing our vulnerabilities is risky but not nearly as dangerous as giving up on love and belonging and joy—the experiences that make us the most vulnerable. Only when we are brave enough to explore the darkness will we discover the infinite power of our light.” So, as we move into the summer months, we challenge you to explore your own darkness. Who can you confide in? What story can you share that hasn’t seen the light of day recently? Who supports you in your path towards opening up to more belonging and joy? Finding friends who can listen empathetically, respond with their own vulnerability, and hold space for emotions that we might have once been taught are “bad”, are precious. Do those friends know what role they play in your life?

I know several of those friends have come from my membership in Division 49. And as we look forward to gathering again at the APA Annual Convention, I’m going to be sure to tell them how important they are to me. We hope you’ll be able to join us in Washington DC in August. Throughout this newsletter you’ll find updates about what to expect and how to best participate.

We look forward to seeing you there!

Tom Treadwell, EdD, T.E.P. C.G.P.
Tom Treadwell, EdD, T.E.P. C.G.P.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Editor

Leann Diederich, Ph.D.
Leann Diederich, Ph.D.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Associate Editor

Categories
Welcome

Editor’s Column

From Your Editors at The Group Psychologist

In this issue of The Group Psychologist you’ll find authors speaking to the powerful roles that groups can have in our lives. While at the recent American Group Psychotherapy Association Annual Meeting, I (Leann) experienced this in many ways. However, one depiction of the power groups have, that caught me off-guard, was while watching the musical Cats. Arguably, one of the most emotional plot lines in the show is that of Grizabella, the old “glamor cat” who is an outcast from the Jellicle tribe of cats. Her anguish at not be accepted, the impact of being shunned, and the loneliness she feels is palpable.  One of the most magical, and at times haunting, songs comes from her singing Memory. Without providing too much of a spoiler, it’s a moving moment in the musical when she is accepted back into the tribe. There is a dark side to groups, their ability to shun, to cut-off, and to wound individuals. Yet, Cats, provides a beautiful visual reminder of the healing power of groups: through acceptance, welcoming, and re-incorporation into something bigger than one’s self.

We encourage you, dear reader, to send us your reactions to the articles in this issue. Better yet, post about them on Facebook! Start out by checking out our President-elect’s recent experiences wondering what attending the Division 49 Mid-Winter Board meeting will be like. Our current President, Dr. Craig Parks, while reflecting on the current state of political discourse takes on the question, “How important is it for opposing groups to be calm and friendly while discussing their differences?”

In a different sort of response to the current political state, in his Group Psychotherapy Column, Dr. Tevya Zukor, points out, “We have the training and experience to understand the dynamics of scapegoating, oppression, and irrational fear-based behavior. Not only do we understand how these processes emerge, but we have thousands of years of combined experience helping people navigate through the worst times of their lives and being there as they to emerge from the darkness that once overwhelmed them.”

Finally, we encourage you to check out the range of awards described in the Diversity Column. These include cash awards of $500 and $1000 for members (or those whose membership is pending) of Division 49. These awards are to “recognize excellence in group psychology practice, research, service, and/or advocacy with a focus on promoting understanding and respect for diversity.” It’s not too early to start thinking about the APA annual convention. The Diversity Committee is hoping to use the Suite to foster dialogue among Division members about diversity in group psychology and group psychotherapy in an informal setting. Please email Dr. Joe Miles (joemiles@utk.edu) if you have ideas or requests about what could be offered.

Tom Treadwell, EdD, T.E.P. C.G.P.
Tom Treadwell, Ed.D., T.E.P. C.G.P.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Editor

Leann Diederich, Ph.D.
Leann Diederich, Ph.D.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Associate Editor

Categories
Welcome

Editor’s Column

Autumn is upon us in the Northern Hemisphere, and winter beckons around the corner. For some, this might mean the relief that rain brings to the parched earth. For others, it means frost on the leaves, brilliant colors on the hillsides, and crisp night air. Whatever it brings for you, we hope that you take a few moments to contemplate the changes that this season brings for you.

This issue of TGP brings some change as well. It’s with a heavy heart as we reflect on Dr. Robert Gleave’s column. He is stepping down from the role of President-elect due to his health concerns. Robert, we value all that you have done for the group psychotherapy field, we admire your quiet strength and depth of spirit, and we appreciate the perspective you articulated in your column, “My predominant feeling is a willingness to learn these next lessons and a sense of peace.” May you continue to find that peace.

Another change to this issue of TGP is the introduction to a new column, Notes from the North. We’ll be featuring a “pen-pal” like relationship with CGPA: Group Therapy, Group Training, Group Facilitation. If you have questions for our Canadian colleagues, please send them our way!  As a child, I (Leann) had a pen-pal from Iowa. I still remember her specific handwriting, and the way she would dot her “i’s” with small hearts. Ah, life before digital emoji’s! There was always a joy in getting a letter from her in the mail, and then pondering what I was going to write back. Perhaps in 20 years we’ll look back with nostalgia at this first Notes from the North column…and marvel at the relationships it has fostered between Division 49 members and our colleagues up north!

This issue also highlights several award winners that were honored at the recent APA Convention in Denver. Dr. Norsworthy was given the Diversity Award and Dr. Maartijn van der Kamp was recognized with the Richard Moreland Dissertation of the Year Award. We encourage you to read about these two individuals in their respective columns. We also wanted to highlight the second Group Psychotherapy Column by Dr. Tevya Zukor. He tackles an especially important topic, how group members need to remember the value of civility and kindness with each other, even when they see actions that might not match their personal values.

And finally, we’ll close with encouraging you to check out Dr. Craig Parks’ President’s Column. He provides an analysis of several movies with group dynamics or group psychotherapy content…and encourages the reader to check out psychmovies.com, as a repository for movies that incorporate psychological content. I, for one, have already checked out the list and am adding a few of the movies to my Netflix queue. The next rainy and windy afternoon, that might be just what the doctor ordered!

Happy Autumn!

Editor

Tom Treadwell, EdD, T.E.P. C.G.P.
Tom Treadwell, EdD, T.E.P. C.G.P.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Associate Editor

Leann Diederich, Ph.D.
Leann Diederich, Ph.D.

 

 

Categories
Welcome

Editor’s Column

It’s summer time! For many professionals at a university or college setting, that means more time out of the classroom, laboratory, committee meetings, counseling center, grant writing and so-forth. How are you going to spend that time? What new activities are you going to undertake? If you don’t have a shift in your work schedule, how can you take advantage of longer daylight hours (for those of us in the Northern Hemisphere)?

For me (Leann), one of my goals this summer was to try something new and (hopefully) fulfilling. While my first idea (sponsoring a local student in training a wild mustang to enter into a regional competition) didn’t materialize due to a number of complicating factors, I decided to try something artistic. I contacted a local artist and scheduled a one-on-one workshop in nuno felting. The process involves working wool fibers into fabric, in my case, a silk scarf. I rarely consider myself artistic, but I do love color! And working with soft and whimsical fibers for a day was a special treat. It became a grounding experience where I was immersed in the moment, choosing how to lay the wool fiber, what shape I wanted to create, and let me tap into a creative side I rarely get to experience in such a tangible way. Being able to approach the project, which presented a number of brand new experiences, was also a treat. How often do we let ourselves do something new, something we aren’t experienced at, and still find it rewarding? Being a beginner is humbling and a great time to practice some self-compassion. While my finished scarf isn’t the beautiful masterpiece I might have hoped for, it’s still beautiful. And it’s symbolic, both of the Southern California kelp forests that were my inspiration for it, but also of the possibilities that new experiences can hold. As I start my next project, a nuno felted scarf done without the mentorship of my new teacher, I’m excited to see what I’ll learn.

In this issue of The Group Psychologist you’ll read about what inspires some of our leaders. In the President’s column by Dr. Craig Parks, you can learn of his goal of creating an annual meeting where leaders in the field of group psychology can come together with professionals in industry and government organizations. We are looking forward to learning more about how this could become a real meeting! And in the column by Dr. Robert Gleave (our President-elect) you can read how his dedication to service has influenced and enriched him over the years.

As you pursue the articles in this issue, if you find one you like, be sure to comment, send it via email to a colleague, or “like” it on Facebook.

Articles or brief reports and news items can be e-mailed directly to Tom, Letitia, and Leann at ttreadwe@mail.med.upenn.edu, as can Letters to the Editor.

PS. If you have children and are looking for some new ideas to do with them this summer, check out: https://www.care.com/a/101-fun-things-to-do-with-kids-this-summer-1305030150

Tom Treadwell, EdD, T.E.P. C.G.P.
Tom Treadwell, EdD, T.E.P. C.G.P.

Editor

Leann Diederich, Ph.D.
Leann Diederich, Ph.D.

Associate Editor

Letitia Travaglini, MA
Letitia Travaglini, MA
Categories
Welcome

Editor’s Column

As I was driving through a nearby town recently, I saw a billboard that caught my eye. It featured three pairs of muddy boots, with the quote “You’ll need these, it’s election time”. While it made me chuckle (with an accompanying grimace for the truth it reflected in this season’s election), it also made me curious. Is “mudslinging” a more recent occurrence in our electoral history?

When I consulted our modern encyclopedia (Wikipedia, of course!) I found the following definition of mudslinging, “trying to win an advantage by referring to negative aspects of an opponent rather than emphasizing one’s own positive attributes or preferred policies” (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Negative_campaigning). Colloquially known as “mudslinging”, an early example of negative campaigning comes from the presidential election of 1828. In the race between Andrew Jackson and the incumbent President John Adams, numerous negative campaigning tactics were used, including attacking Jackson’s marriage and his propensity for dueling! Contrary to my idealistic perspective of our history, apparently mudslinging has a long legacy in our elections.

Fortunately, we are part of an organization whose candidates don’t need to resort to negative campaigning. As you’ll read in this issue, it’s election time for the Society, as we are looking for a President-elect, Secretary, Member-at-Large, Student Representative, and Council Representative. Each nominee for these positions has prepared a brief candidate statement so you can learn a bit more about who they are. We urge you to become an educated voter by investigating the candidates, and if you have questions, please reach out to them to get more details about their visions for participating in the leadership for our Society.

Also in this issue, you can learn more about Scholarships for students to attend the Annual Convention in Denver, CO, E-mail application materials to rosamondjanesmith@gmail.com and a Virtual Learning Hour hosted by the Early Career Psychologist Task Force on Women in Leadership. Please RSVP for access to div49group@gmail.com.

If you like one of the articles you read, be sure to comment, send it via email to a colleague, or “like” it on Facebook.

Articles or brief reports and news items can be e-mailed directly to Tom, Letitia, and Leann at ttreadwe@mail.med.upenn.edu, as can Letters to the Editor.

Tom Treadwell, EdD, T.E.P. C.G.P.
Tom Treadwell, EdD, T.E.P. C.G.P.

Editor

Leann Diederich, Ph.D.
Leann Diederich, Ph.D.

Associate Editor

Letitia Travaglini, MA
Letitia Travaglini, MA