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Awards

Dissertation Award

Richard Moreland, Ph.D.
Richard Moreland, Ph.D.

Richard Moreland Dissertation of the Year Award

This award honors a recent dissertation by someone whose research on small groups is especially promising. The winner is announced and the prize is conferred at the annual American Psychological Association Convention. Included in the award are $1,000, a plaque, and a three-year membership in the division. Only dissertations that were completed during the prior calendar year are eligible, but the research described in those dissertations can explore any group phenomenon, using any methodology to investigate any type of group. A committee reviews all the abstracts and selects three finalists, who then submit complete copies of their dissertations for the committee’s evaluation.

A five-page, double-spaced abstract of your work should be sent to Richard Moreland, PhD, by Dec. 31 (every year).

Richard Moreland, PhD
Department of Psychology
3103 Sennott Square
University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh, PA. 15260

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Awards News

Dissertation Award

Division 49 is proud to announce the winner of our Dissertation Research Award for 2015.

Maartijn van der Kamp, Ph.D.
Maartijn van der Kamp, Ph.D.

He is Dr. Maartijn van der Kamp, from the University of Melbourne, and his dissertation was entitled “Group Faultlines” in strategic alliances.  His research focuses on faultline activation, defined as the process by which members of a team come to perceive subgroups, and faultline deactivation, the process of minimizing the salience of perceived subgroups in teams, in the context of strategic alliances.  Dr. van der Kamp has won $1000 in case, a free three-year membership in the Division, and a commemorative plaque.

Division 49 makes such an award every year.  To enter next year’s contest, if you completed a dissertation during calendar year 2016, contact Dr. Richard Moreland (cslewis@pitt.edu) for information.

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News

Dissertation Award

Richard Moreland, Ph.D.
Richard Moreland, Ph.D.

Each year, Division 49 (Group Psychology & Group Psychotherapy) of the American Psychological Association offers an award for the best dissertation research on small groups. This research can investigate any phenomenon, using any methodology, in any type of group. Past winners of the award include Drs. Karen Jehn, Deborah Gruenfeld, Amy Edmondson, and Kyle Lewis. The award comprises cash ($1000), a plaque, and a three-year free membership in the Division.

People who complete a dissertation on groups sometime during calendar year 2015 are welcome to enter the competition. To enter, a brief abstract (5 pages maximum, typewritten and double-spaced) of the dissertation should be sent to Dr. Richard Moreland (408 Fern Hollow Lane, Wexford, PA; 15090; cslewis@pitt.edu). The deadline for submitting abstracts is March 1st, 2016. Dr. Moreland will send copies of the submitted abstracts to a small review committee for evaluation, and that committee will select three finalists. These finalists will be asked to submit complete copies of their dissertations, which will then be reviewed by the same committee. The winner will receive his or her award at the APA Convention in August, 2016.

If you completed a dissertation on groups last year, then please consider entering the competition. Or, if you know someone else who completed such a dissertation, then please mention the competition to him or her. Remember, the dissertation research can explore any phenomenon, using any methodology, in any type of group.

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Awards News

2014 Richard Moreland Dissertation of the Year Award

Conversational flow: The Emergence and Regulation of Solidarity Through Social Interaction

University of Groningen

namkje
Namkje Kooudenburg Ph.D.

The central aim of this dissertation was to study whether such micro-characteristics of the form of dialogue influence processes at a more macro-level, such as the emergence and regulation of social structures. Two conclusions are drawn: First, it appears that subtle aspects in the form of conversation (e.g., brief silences, interruptions) reveal information about both the closeness and the quality of underlying social relationships. Second, the form of a conversation provides means to regulate and maintain the solidarity within the group. In small groups, core characteristics such as social norms, status hierarchies and shared realities “define the group” in the sense that they are affirmed through communication between members. In smoothly flowing conversation, the group members’ actions towards each other reflect the social structures that exist within the group. Behavior that deviates from this framework poses a potential threat to the stability of the social system. Indeed, when a low status group member interrupts a high status other, this may threaten assumptions of group hierarchy and thus call in doubt the solidarity. Because disruptions of the normal flow of conversation may signal that something within the social system is wrong, this should normally (i.e., when the continuation of those systems is valued) elicit behavior that is aimed at re-establishing unity. Thus, solidarity is not only maintained by sanctioning deviants, but also by more subtle cues in communication that inform people about the status of the relationship between speakers.

Dissertation Award Guidelines:

Each year, the Society of Group Psychology and Group Psychotherapy of the American Psychological Association gives an award for the best dissertation research on small groups. The research can apply any methodology to the analysis of any type of group. People who wish to compete for the award first submit an abstract, which is read by a committee of three division members. The three best abstracts are identified by the committee and the authors are asked to submit full copies of their dissertations. The same committee reads those dissertations and then selects the final winner.

The committee for the latest (2014) award was Dr. Richard Moreland (chair), Dr. Dennis Kivlighan, Dr. Flip Robison, and Dr. Catherine Shea (who won the 2013 award). The three finalists were Dr. Namkje Kooudenburg (University of Groningen), Dr. Florian Landkammer (University of Tubingen), and Dr. Jamie Perry (Rutgers School of Business).

The winner of the prize was Dr. Koudenburg, whose dissertation was entitled “Conversational flow: The emergence and regulation of solidarity through social interaction.” Dr. Koudenburg won $1000, a commemorative plaque, and a three-year membership in the division. She will receive her award at the annual Business Meeting of the division at this year’s APA convention in Toronto.

The same contest will be held again this year. People who completed dissertations during calendar year 2015 are encouraged to submit abstracts of their work to Dr. Richard Moreland (cslewis@pitt.edu) by March 1st of 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.apadivisions.org/division-49/awards/dissertation.aspx