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Group Psychology and Group Psychotherapy Diversity Column

Joe Miles, Ph.D.
Joe Miles, Ph.D.

Group Psychology and Group Psychotherapy Diversity Column

The Diversity Committee met in the Division 49 Hospitality Suite at the annual American Psychological Association Convention in Washington, DC. The Committee has several initiatives we will be focusing on in the coming year:

First, we hope to develop a webinar series focused on diversity and social justice in group. If there are specific topics related to diversity and social justice in group you would like to see covered in a webinar, please let us know! You can send ideas to Joe Miles at joemiles@utk.edu.

In addition, the Committee is working together with our Program Chair, Debra O’Connell, to develop a Diversity and Social Justice in Group Poster Session at the 2018 APA Convention. This will be a second poster session, in addition to our usual poster session, and will give us the opportunity to highlight posters that specifically present research, clinical practice, or advocacy efforts aimed at promoting diversity and social justice in group work. Student Poster Awards will be given to the top three posters (in addition to the student poster awards given in the general poster session). Cash prizes of $300, $200, and $100 for the first, second, and third place, respectively! Posters should be submitted and will be reviewed following the standard procedures for poster submissions. Authors should indicate in their proposal that the poster is to be considered for the Diversity and Social Justice in Group Poster Session. The deadline for proposal submissions is 5:00 PM ET on Thursday, December 1, 2017. More information on how to submit proposals can be found in the APA Call for Proposals: http://www.apa.org/convention/proposals.aspx.

The Committee also hopes to develop a Diversity and Social Justice in Group section of the Division 49 Website. We envision this section as a place to highlight research related to diversity and social justice in group, and to share resources (e.g., syllabi, articles, guidelines). If you have ideas about what you might like to see in this section of the website, or if you have resources or other material you would like to share, please let us know!

Finally, the Committee is excited to welcome our new Chair, Nikki Coleman, Associate Professor of Counseling Psychology in the Department of Psychological, Health, & Learning Sciences at the University of Houston. Dr. Coleman is also the incoming Member-at-Large for Diversity for the Board of Division 49. Welcome, Dr. Coleman!

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Group Dynamics Editor

Joe Miles, Ph.D.

Call for Nominations for Journal Editor of Group Dynamics: Theory, Research, and Practice

The Society of Group Psychology and Group Psychotherapy (Division 49) of the American Psychological Association has opened nominations for the Editorship of the Division’s journal, Group Dynamics: Theory, Research, and Practice for the term of January 1, 2019 to December 31, 2023.

Group Dynamics: Theory, Research, and Practice (GDN) is a peer-reviewed, quarterly journal that publishes original empirical articles, theoretical analyses, literature reviews, and brief reports dealing with basic and applied topics in the field of group research and application. The editors construe the phrase group dynamics in the broadest sense—the scientific study of all aspects of groups—and publish work by investigators in such fields as psychology, psychiatry, sociology, education, communication, and business.

The journal publishes articles examining groups in a range of contexts, including ad hoc groups in experimental settings, therapy groups, naturally forming friendship groups and cliques, organizational units, self-help groups, and learning groups. Theoretically driven empirical studies of hypotheses that have implications for understanding and improving groups in organizational, educational, and therapeutic settings are particularly encouraged.

Candidates should be available to start receiving manuscripts as the Incoming Editor on January 1, 2018 to prepare for issues published in 2019. David K. Marcus, Ph.D. is the incumbent editor, whose term ends on December 31, 2018.

Please note that Society of Group Psychology and Group Psychotherapy encourages participation by members of underrepresented groups in the publication process and would particularly welcome such nominees. Self-nominations are also encouraged.

Joseph R. Miles, Ph.D., will chair the search. To nominate a candidate (or yourself), please send the candidate’s name and contact information to Joseph Miles at joemiles@utk.edu. He will follow up with all nominees to assess interest and request additional materials.

Deadline for accepting nominations is July 1, 2017, when reviews will begin.

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Group Psychology and Group Psychotherapy Diversity Column

Joe Miles, Ph.D.

Recognizing Diversity

The Diversity Committee of the Society of Group Psychology and Group Psychotherapy is hard at work evaluating applications for our first ever Student Diversity Award. The winner will be announced at the Division 49 Business Meeting at 2:00 PM on Friday, August 4th at the 2017 APA Convention in Washington, DC. Thank you to all who nominated students for this award!

The Diversity Committee will be meeting on Friday, August 4th at 12:00 PM in the Division 49 Hospitality Suite at the 2017 APA Convention. We will be sure to wrap up the meeting in time to head to the Division 49 Presidential Address at 1 PM. If you are interested in joining the Committee, please email Joe Miles at joemiles@utk.edu, or join us at our meeting in the Hospitality Suite on August 4th!

Finally, we would like to highlight two programs relevant to diversity and social justice in group work at this year’s convention.

  • 10:00 AM: Symposium: Group Therapy with Diverse College Women (1 hour)
  • 2:00 PM: Conversation Hour: A Dialogue about Dialogue: Implementation of Intergroup Dialogue on College Campuses (2 hours)

We hope to see you there!

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Other Information

Call for Nominations

Joe Miles, Ph.D.

Call for Nominations for Journal Editor of Group Dynamics: Theory, Research, and Practice

The Society of Group Psychology and Group Psychotherapy (Division 49) of the American Psychological Association has opened nominations for the Editorship of the Division’s journal, Group Dynamics: Theory, Research, and Practice for the term of January 1, 2019 to December 31, 2023.

Group Dynamics: Theory, Research, and Practice (GDN) is a peer-reviewed, quarterly journal that publishes original empirical articles, theoretical analyses, literature reviews, and brief reports dealing with basic and applied topics in the field of group research and application. The editors construe the phrase group dynamics in the broadest sense—the scientific study of all aspects of groups—and publish work by investigators in such fields as psychology, psychiatry, sociology, education, communication, and business.

The journal publishes articles examining groups in a range of contexts, including ad hoc groups in experimental settings, therapy groups, naturally forming friendship groups and cliques, organizational units, self-help groups, and learning groups. Theoretically driven empirical studies of hypotheses that have implications for understanding and improving groups in organizational, educational, and therapeutic settings are particularly encouraged.

Candidates should be available to start receiving manuscripts as the Incoming Editor on January 1, 2018 to prepare for issues published in 2019. David K. Marcus, Ph.D. is the incumbent editor, whose term ends on December 31, 2018.

Please note that Society of Group Psychology and Group Psychotherapy encourages participation by members of underrepresented groups in the publication process and would particularly welcome such nominees. Self-nominations are also encouraged.

Joseph R. Miles, Ph.D., will chair the search. To nominate a candidate (or yourself), please send the candidate’s name and contact information to Joseph Miles at joemiles@utk.edu. He will follow up with all nominees to assess interest and request additional materials.

Deadline for accepting nominations is June 1, 2017, when reviews will begin.

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Diversity Committee

Joe Miles, Ph.D.

Recognizing Student and Professional Contributions to Diversity in Group Psychology and Group Psychotherapy

The Society of Group Psychology and Group Psychotherapy Diversity Committee is pleased to announce a new Student Award for Outstanding Contribution to Diversity in Group Psychology. This award is in addition to the Award for Outstanding Professional Contribution to Diversity in Group Psychology. Both awards may be given each year to qualified nominees. Information about both awards can be found below:

1. The Student Award for Outstanding Contribution to Diversity in Group Psychology or Group Psychotherapy

The Student Award for Outstanding Professional Contribution to Diversity in Group Psychology or Group Psychotherapy seeks to recognize excellence in group psychology practice, research, service, and/or advocacy with a focus on promoting understanding and respect for diversity.  All who are members of Division 49 (or whose application for membership is currently pending) are eligible. Nominations may come from self or others. The award will be presented at the annual American Psychological Association Convention. A $500.00 cash award and plaque will be presented to the award winner. Nominations materials should include and be limited to the following:

  • Names, phone numbers, program and institutional affiliations, APA divisional membership of yourself (the endorser) and of your nominee.
  • A brief letter highlighting your nominee’s contributions in promoting understanding and respect for diversity in group psychology practice, research, service and/or advocacy.
  • The nominee’s vita.
  • All materials should be submitted via a zipped/compressed folder in one email with the following subject line: [Candidate’s First and Last Name] –Application for Group Dynamics Teaching Award. For example, MARGARET WISE BROWN – APPLICATION FOR STUDENT DIVERSITY AWARD.zip.

All submissions must be received by May 1, 2017 to be considered. Send to division49awards@gmail.com

2. The Award for Outstanding Professional Contribution to Diversity in Group Psychology or Group Psychotherapy

The Award for Outstanding Professional Contribution to Diversity in Group Psychology or Group Psychotherapy started in 2012 and is awarded every year. This award honors psychologists who have made significant contributions to group psychology practice, research, service, and/or mentoring, with a focus on promoting understanding and respect for diversity.  All who are members of Division 49 (or whose application for membership is currently pending) are eligible. Nominations may come from self or others. The award will be presented at the annual American Psychological Association Convention. A $1,000.00 cash award and plaque will be presented to the award winner. Nominations materials should include and be limited to the following:

  • Names, phone numbers, program and institutional affiliations, APA divisional membership of yourself (the endorser) and of your nominee.
  • A brief letter highlighting the nominee’s contributions in promoting understanding and respect for diversity in group psychology practice, research, service and/or mentoring.
  • The nominee’s vita.
  • All materials should be submitted via a zipped/compressed folder in one email with the following subject line: [Candidate’s First and Last Name] –Application for Group Dynamics Teaching Award. For example, ERICA BLADE – APPLICATION FOR DIVERSITY AWARD.zip.

Self-nominations are accepted. Nominations are reviewed by the Diversity Committee and voted on by the board of directors at its midwinter meeting.

All submissions must be received by May 1, 2017 to be considered. Send to division49awards@gmail.com


Diversity Programming at APA in Washington, DC

The Diversity Committee would like to help highlight diversity-related programming at the 2017 APA Convention in Washington, DC this August. If you will be presenting on a topic related to diversity in group psychology or group psychotherapy, please let us know! You can send titles of your presentations to Joe Miles at joemiles@utk.edu.

In addition, the Diversity Committee is interested in developing a diversity-related program in the Division 49 Hospitality Suite at the Convention. This program could take the form of a conversation hour, mentoring session, or panel of speakers. Our goal is to foster dialogue among Division members about diversity in group psychology and group psychotherapy in an informal setting. We would like to hear from you about diversity-related topics or types of programming you would like to see in the Suite! Please email any ideas or requests to Joe Miles at joemiles@utk.edu.

Join the Diversity Committee!

Do you have a passion for diversity and social justice in group psychology or group psychotherapy? Consider joining the Diversity Committee! The committee was established in 2007 “to promote the inclusion and visibility of underrepresented minorities in the society. The committee is also charged with attracting, fostering, and managing diversity in membership and activities of the society, and developing and recommending policies and programs designed to educate members of the division in this area in their practice, research and training” (see: http://www.apadivisions.org/division-49/leadership/committees/index.aspx). If you are interested in learning more, please contact Joe Miles at joemiles@utk.edu.

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Committee Reports

Diversity Committee Report

Division 49 Diversity Committee

Chairs:  Joe Miles, Ph.D. and Eric Chen Ph.D.

Person Submitting Report:  Jeanne Steffen

Members of Committee:

Eric Chen Lee Gillis
Maria Riva Jennilee Fuertes
Cheri Marmarosh Keri Frantell
Joe Miles Carol Cho


Brief Summary of Activities Undertaken:

Our activities since the August update of the June 2016 report have included:

August

  • This was the year to elect a new chair for the diversity subcommittee. Joe Miles was nominated, however, due to his commitment in other Division 49 activities, we discussed and decided on splitting up the responsibilities of the chair position.  Joe Miles and Eric Chen agreed to split the role and we welcomed them as co-chairs.
  • Eric and Keri arranged suite programming at the APA Convention to invite conversations re: multicultural group therapy. We were hoping to use the opportunity for suite programming to recruit more members to our subcommittee.  Unfortunately, only one guest attended so the program was cancelled and the time was use to explore future goals for the committee.
  • Subcommittee members met at APA to discuss goals for 2016-17, which are: 1) increase numbers and diversity of members (e.g., international members and members across different disciplines); 2) increase communication resources (e.g., message boards, culturally sensitive/multiculturally competent group resources); 3) increase APA programming (e.g., processing current events, welcoming first time attendees, partnering with APAGS/17, utilizing award winners as speakers or writing for the newsletter); 4) developing a product (e.g., books, videos).
  • We also discussed the diversity award and: 1) the idea of emailing the runners up so they know that they were nominated, even if they didn’t win; 2) adding a student diversity award; 3) asking the executive board to submit nominees

Items Needing to be Discussed: 

Discuss action items/objectives to complete each quarter to further goals as described above.

Items Needing Action:

Establishing action items.

Recommendations, if any:

Jeanne to send Joe information re: responsibilities and an outline of annual deadlines for chair position

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Welcome

Candidate Statement: Secretary, Joe Miles

Joe Miles, Ph.D.
Joe Miles, Ph.D.

I am pleased to run for Secretary of the Society of Group Psychology and Group Psychotherapy. I have had a many experiences that have fueled my excitement about the Society, and my desire to pursue a leadership position. I served as Co-Chair of the Ad Hoc Committee for Early Career Psychologists, helping offer conference calls designed to share expertise, foster relationships across diverse group interests, and connect ECPs to others in later career stages. I also serve on the Society’s Diversity Committee, and have helped develop diversity-related programming at recent Conventions.

I served as Program Co-Chair and Chair for the 2014 and 2015 APA Conventions, respectively. As Chair, I solicited, reviewed, and scheduled regular programming, while developing relationships and programming across divisions through APA’s Collaborative Programming initiative. This helped highlight the potential for collaborations across many divisions, and the importance of groups across all of psychology. These positions required enthusiasm, attention to detail, and a passion for group work, which I would also bring to the position of Secretary.

Groups are also at the heart of my research and teaching. My primary interest is the process and outcome of intergroup dialogue, a group intervention that brings together individuals from social identity groups with a history of tension between them for sustained, face-to-face communication. This work gives me a strong appreciation for the power of groups, and the work of the Society.

The Society is my professional home. I am passionate about groups, and dedicated to the Society. I would be honored to share this passion and dedication as Secretary. Thank you for your consideration.

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Early Career Psychologists

Early Career Psychologists: 2015 Division 49 APA Program Summary

Division 49 has an exciting program planned for the 2015 APA Convention!

toronto_night_skyline

Where: Toronto, Canada

When: August 6 – 9, 2015

Below are some program highlights that you will not want to miss.

  • The Division 49 Poster Session will be held in the exhibition halls at 1:00 PM on August 6th.
  • Group Psychologist of the Year Award winner, Zipora Schechtman, will give a talk entitled, Lessons learned from research on outcomes and processes of children/adolescence group psychotherapy at 2:00 PM on August 6th.
  • The Division is also starting a new tradition with a Fellows Address, featuring our newest Fellows, at 11:00 AM on August 7th.
  • Dennis Kivlighan, will give his Presidential Address entitled, Group Psychology and Group Psychotherapy: One Country With a Common Language or Two Feudal States? at 2:00 PM on August 7th, followed by the Division Business Meeting.
  • At 1:00 PM on August 8th, Molyn Leszcz will give an Invited Address entitled, Achieving and Sustaining Group Therapist, followed by a conversation hour in the Division 49 Hospitality Suite.
  • The Division 49 Early Career Task Force will also be hosting the annual Division Social Hour in the Hospitality Suite from 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM on Saturday, August 8th. Join us for free food, drinks and prizes (e.g. Amazon gift cards and Fitbit!)
  • We have four skill-building workshops and five symposia throughout the Convention that will each offer continuing education credits.
  • The Division is also co-sponsoring five Collaborative Programs with other APA Divisions.

(Please be sure to check the official APA program or Convention app. for updates in the schedule)

The Hospitality Suite will be located in the Fairmont Royal York Hotel. Please see signage in the hotel for the specific room number.

Please remember, that if you are traveling to Canada from another country, including the United States, you will need a valid passport.

We are looking forward to seeing you in Toronto!

Program Co-Chairs,

Jill Paquin, Ph.D. and Joe Miles, Ph.D.

Joe Miles, Ph.D.
Joe Miles, Ph.D.

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Early Career Psychologists

Highlights from the Early Career Task Force’s Supervision of Group Psychotherapy Conference Call

Joe Miles Ph.D.
Joe Miles Ph.D.

Periodically, the Early Career Psychologist (ECP) Task Force of the Society hosts conference calls on topics that are of interest to group psychologists. The most recent of these conference calls was held on June 16th, and focused on supervision of group psychotherapy. Over 30 people RSVP’d to participate in this conference call, which covered issues related to supervision models at various training sites, multicultural issues in supervision of group work, and issues in co-leader relationships (e.g., building the relationship, sharing power, and dual relationships). The call offered the opportunity for group psychotherapists from a variety of different settings to raise questions, discuss challenges and successes in group supervision, and to share resources with each other. Below are some of the highlights from this phone call.

Supervision Models in Various Settings

Several participants shared that they use developmental approaches to group supervision at their training sites. One such approach involves having practicum students serve as process observers who write process notes for psychotherapy groups that are facilitated by more advanced trainees (e.g., postdoctoral interns and staff). The process observers are then responsible for sharing these notes with the group in the following session. After a semester or two of process observing, these practicum students move on to co-leading a psychotherapy group with a licensed staff member. These licensed staff members serve as both models and the trainees’ supervisors. In addition, some participants mentioned that the group coordinators at their sites also meet with group trainees for one hour per week.

Another model of group psychotherapy supervision discussed was the use of agency-wide group case conferences. These provide an opportunity for the entire staff, not just the trainees, to meet, watch videos from group sessions, discuss particularly difficult situations, and to share group experiences with one another. An advantage of these agency-wide case conferences is that they provide the opportunity for licensed staff members to engage in additional learning about group work, thus providing opportunities for all participants to grow, not just trainees. These different models highlight the many levels on which group psychotherapy supervision may be offered.

In discussing different models for group psychotherapy supervision, the question was raised as to how different individuals have gotten “buy in” from other staff members about the importance of group work and group training. Several participants from a large counseling center at a major, public state university talked with pride about their group program. They stated that, in the face of ever-increasing demand for services, their center has put a lot of effort into strengthening their group program. Specifically, they said that group treatment is discussed as a viable treatment with all clients at intake, and clients are encouraged to consider group over individual treatment. In addition, this center holds a “Fall Group Kick-Off” at the beginning of the year, in order to reenergize staff about groups and to provide some group training. For example, they provide staff with client scenarios and then have the staff members discuss which groups offered at the center might be possible treatment option for the client. They also do periodic “Group Spotlights” at staff meetings about groups still accepting new member. These efforts to strengthen their group program have paid off, and have led to a “culture shift” in their center over the past few years, such that group is now seen as just as good of an option for clients as individual treatment.

Co-Leader Relationships and Group Supervision

The participants discussed the importance of talking about cultural issues among co-leader pairs, and Leann Diederich shared a handout that she, Eri Bentley (Utah State University) and Joeleen Cooper-Bhatia (Auburn University) developed on establishing effective co-leader relationships (see attached “Discussion Guide for Building Effective Co-Leadership Relationships”, along with the a handout called “The One-Minute Co-Therapist”). An important part of this handout is the discussion of “Personal Background Information,” which should include cultural information. This handout provides guidelines for sharing cultural influences with supervisees. Others shared that they find it important to openly discuss any potential biases that one might have. Participants noted that it is important to be aware of and talk about power differentials, however, when engaging in conversations about multicultural issues with supervisees, and to realize that this should be an ongoing process.

The conversation turned to some of the difficulties in managing conflict in the co-leader relationship, particularly when one co-leader is a trainee and the other is a staff member with an evaluative/supervisory role. One participant shared a resource that she has found particularly helpful: an article by Miriam Berger called Envy and Generosity between Co-Therapists (citation below). This article may be helpful for naming and talking through some of the challenges that we might expect in any co-leader relationship.

Several participants noted that, when one co-leader is a trainee and the other a senior staff member/supervisor, the supervisor might intentionally “miss” a group session, in order to provide the trainee to lead the group on her own, and to work on developing her own voice. This can also be helpful in creating a greater sense of equality in the co-leader relationship. Others mentioned that, as a senior staff member or supervisor, they often ask their trainee co-leaders to take on the role of opening and closing the group, in order to share ownership of the group, and to help the group members see the co-leaders on the same level.

Participants discussed a shared challenge of balancing between allowing a trainee co-leader to feel empowered to intervene as they deem fit in the group, with the desire to intervene themselves when they think there is a different or “better” intervention to be made that the trainee has not made. One participant said that in his own struggles with this challenge, he has learned discipline in allowing trainees to find their own voice and providing a place for them to speak, even if he sees an opportunity for a slightly different intervention. Another participant talked about setting very specific goals with supervisees, such as making sure that they are responding at least twice every half hour in the group. Another suggested that it is helpful to talk to supervisees about their different experience co-leading with different co-leaders, and to periodically have meetings where the entire staff discusses group work.

Other Issues in the Supervision of Group Psychotherapy

Participants shared a variety of different structures for supervision of group psychotherapy. For example, several suggested that it is especially helpful to set aside a half hour immediately following the group to debrief, when possible. Another participant discussed meeting in the 10 or 15 minutes directly before the group starts. He said that, in his experience, this has helped him to solidify his relationships with co-leaders, and to allow them the opportunity to discuss what they, as leaders, are bringing to the group.

A group therapist in private practice described another model of supervision, a consultation group. He described a model that he developed for facilitating consultation groups for group psychotherapists. In these 80 minute consultation groups, participants begin by talking about dilemmas that they are facing in their group work. Following this aspect of the group supervision, the second part of his consultation groups become process groups, in which group members have the opportunity to experience being group members. He ends the groups by talking about what went on for him as the leader of the process group portion, what he felt was happening in the group, and how he tried to determine the best interventions. Another participant asked about obtaining informed consent, and it was noted that there is definitely a need to attend to dual relationships in this work.

Finally, several participants discussed balancing supervision with more didactic methods. Several participants discussed having seminars in the summer, or early on in the semester, before trainees’ caseloads fill up. Another participant mentioned seminars that included both trainees and all staff members who are leading groups. This may even include discussing articles on group counseling. A few resources that were shared are listed below. Please look for information on upcoming ECP Task Force conference calls in the near future!

Resources
http://www.cc-sig.org/resource-page/counseling-center-resources/training-resources/.

Berger, M. (2002). Envy and generosity between co-therapists. Group, 26(1), 107-121.

Davis, F. B. & Lohr, N. E. (1971). Special problems with the use of cotherapists in group
psychotherapy. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 21, 143158.

Dick, B., Lessler, K. & Whiteside, J. (1980) A Developmental Framework for Cotherapy.
International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 30(3), 6476.

Fernando, D. M., & Herlihy, B. R. (2010). Supervision of group work: Infusing the spirit of social justice. The Journal for Specialists in Group Work, 35, 281-289.

Gallagher, R. E., (1994). Stages of group psychotherapy supervision: a model for supervisiong
beginning trainees of dynamic group therapy. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 44(2),169183

Heilfron, M. (1969). Cotherapy: The relationship between therapists. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 19(3), 366381.

Hoffman, S. et. al (1995) Cotherapy with Individuals, Families and Groups,Jason Aronson McGee, T.F., & Schuman, B. N. (1970). The nature of the cotherapy relationship. Presented at American Group Psychotherapy Convention, New Orleans, Louisiana.

Paulson, I, Burroughs, J., Gelb, C., (1976) Cotherapy: What is the Crux of the Relationship? International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 26(2), 213224.

Roller, W., & Nelson, V. (1991). The Art of Co-Therapy. New York, NY: Guildford Press.

Rutan, J. S., Stone, W. N., & Shay, J. J. (2007). Chapter 11: Special Leadership Issues. In
Psychodynamic Group Psychotherapy (4th ed.). (pp. 212-225). New York, NY: Guildford Press.
**Read 212-219

See also handouts available from ECP Task Force (div49@gmail.com): “The One-Minute Co-Therapist,” and “Discussion Guide for Building Effective Co-Leader Relationships.”