Categories
Early Career Psychologists

Early Career Psychologists

Early Career Psychologists

Dear Colleagues:

Given the challenging and sometimes divisive world we live in it is no surprise that we are addressing potentially polarizing topics in group.  An upcoming community conversation hour (hosted by the early career psychologist task force) is focused on how to navigate polarizing political topics in group.

Join us in a lively informal conversation, sharing your experiences with fellow group colleagues at all levels. Our hope is to provide a space for participants to discuss how we can initiate and facilitate useful conversations and minimize the polarization around political topics such as race, political parties, the “Time’s Up” Movement, etc. as group leaders.

This CCH will be on March 23rd at Noon (Eastern time) and is conducted via Zoom.

Please email the Society of Group Psychology and Group Psychotherapy for access to this free CCH at div49group@gmail.com.

Categories
Early Career Psychologists

Early Career Group Psychologist Column

Misha Bogomaz, Psy.D., C.G.P.
Misha Bogomaz, Psy.D., C.G.P.

Facilitating Your First Group

 

I remember vividly the first group I ever co-led during my doctoral internship. My experience in graduate school led me to believe that group is my love and passion. I participated as a group member in various training groups and even had a chance to co-lead a few of them. All of my experiences led up to that one moment; I was about to co-facilitate with my group supervisor. He had decades of experience facilitating and training numerous interns. Of course, I wanted to stand out. Of course, I wanted to be special. Of course, I wanted to impress him! On the outside, I looked calm and ready to go despite feeling tremendous anxiety on the inside. It was important to show him that I looked calm and competent.

A few minutes into our pre-group meeting, he looked straight at me and said: “Misha, I have two things to tell you. First, you need to make sure you’re having fun doing the group. If we are not having fun, it would not be a good experience for the group members.” The goal of having fun never entered my mind at any point during group training. I wondered what was the other piece of wisdom he was about to bestow on me.

“I need you to CTFD, please”, he said. I must have looked very puzzled because he chuckled and asked whether I knew what it meant. I had no idea. He leaned in and said “I need you to calm the f**k down. If something goes wrong, we will fix it.” We both burst out in laughter! With a sigh of relief and fear, I realized he could see right through my calm demeanor. Suddenly I realized that it was okay to be me. It was okay to have all kinds of experiences as a facilitator including anxiety. I also understood that no matter what happens in the group, we will deal with it. Something will always go wrong. However, we… I can fix it!

 

I took this idea to heart in my personal life as well. Instead of concentrating on what can go wrong interpersonally, I concentrate on our amazing capacity for repair. In groups, we repair — in more than one sense. In our personal life, CTFDing and engaging in repair, can lead to amazing deepness in any relationship.

 

I would like to pass this on to anyone about to start a group: CTFD, believe in your capacity to repair, and most importantly, have fun.

 

Categories
Early Career Psychologists

Call for Mentors

Keri Frantell, M.S.
Keri Frantell, M.S.

Mentors Wanted

The student committee is still actively looking for people willing to serve as mentors for students who are interested in getting more involved in group work. This is not limited to people who are interested in group therapy or research, we are looking for a good blend of people holding different positions. Expectations are as follows:

 

  • Provide your mentee an email address or phone number where you can be contacted to answer questions related to professional development (e.g., coursework, future employment, practicum, training experiences, etc.), as needed.
  • Be accessible to have a face-to-face meeting (e.g., lunch, dinner, coffee) with the mentee one to two times per year, such as at APA or convention and/or be available to meet through another means, such as by phone, email or Skype.
  • Assist mentee in networking and meeting with other professionals and/or students in Div. 49 or APA at large. This networking could occur at the Div. 49 social and/or other events.
  • Commit to a one-year mentorship relationship.
  • Refrain from entering into a supervisory relationship with your mentee.
  • Respond to mentee challenges and follow grievance procedures, as appropriate.
  • Maintain Div. 49 member status.

You can apply online by going to http://www.apadivisions.org/division-49/membership/mentor-program.aspx and submitting an application (just asking for basic information to help us better connect mentors to mentees). Though we plan to keep mentorship open throughout the year, we would like to ask people who are particularly interested (this goes for both mentors/mentees) to submit an application before the end of each month. 

Please feel free to pass this email along to colleagues, too. I hope many of you will be able to serve!

Categories
Early Career Psychologists

Division 49 Mentorship Program

Rosamond J. Smith, MS
Rosamond J. Smith, MS

Division 49 Mentorship Program

We are pleased to introduce the Division 49 mentorship program!  The program was created based on requests from Division 49 student members and is intended to help the next generation of group psychologists enhance their training and professional development and ultimately to help the division and the field grow stronger.  We accept applications on a rolling basis and will make every effort to match mentorship pairs as suitable matches become available.  We welcome mentees in any stage of graduate training or early career, within the first three years of graduation.  We welcome mentor applications from anyone who has obtained their doctoral degree and has some demonstrated expertise in group psychology and/or group psychotherapy.  Early career psychologists, do not underestimate what you have to offer!

Mentor Expectations:

  • Provide your mentee an email address or phone number where they could contact you to ask questions related to professional development (coursework, future employment, practicum, training experiences, etc.) as needed
  • Be accessible to have for a face-to-face meeting (lunch, dinner, coffee) with the mentee 1-2x per year, such as at APA, and/or meet through another means, such as phone, email, or Skype
  • Assist mentee in networking and meeting with other professionals and/or students in Division 49 or APA at large.  This could occur at the Division 49 social and/or other events
  • Commit to a one-year mentorship relationship
  • Refrain from entering into a supervisory relationship with your mentee
  • Respond to mentee challenges and follow grievance procedures, as appropriate
  • Maintain Division 49 member status

Mentee Expectations:

  • Contact your mentor as needed to ask questions related to professional development (coursework, future employment, practicum, training experiences, etc.)
  • Be accessible to have for a face-to-face meeting (lunch, dinner, coffee) with your mentor 1-2x per year, such as at APA, and/or meet through another means, such as phone, email, or Skype
  • If attending APA, network with your mentor to meet with other professionals and/or students in Division 49 or APA at large.  This could occur at the Division 49 social and/or other events
  • Commit to a one-year mentorship relationship.  After this point, you could exit the mentorship program or ask to be connected with another mentor to gain broad exposure to professionals in the field
  • Avoid entering into a supervisory relationship with your mentor by refraining from discussing any client concerns with your mentor
  • Maintain Division 49 student member status

Thanks to the AGPA CC-SIG for their model of a successful mentorship program, from which some of these materials were adapted.

Application Questions

Please complete the following questions and submit your application to the mentorship director, Rosamond Smith rosamondjanesmith@gmail.com. Applications for both mentors and mentees will be taken on a rolling basis, and as such, we will try to match mentees as soon as possible.

Mentors

  • Name:
  • Degree:
  • Graduate program and date:
  • License and date:
  • Current employer and title:
  • Research interests:
  • Group specialties:
  • Current group research (if applicable):
  • Current groups leading (if applicable):
  • What do you think you have to offer a mentee?  If you are interested specifically in research collaboration with a mentee, please list that here.
  • Do you have preferences about the stage of training or development of your mentee?  (If so, please list.)
  • Do you have any other preferences regarding your mentee?

Mentees

  • Name:
  • Graduate university and program:
  • Year in program or graduation date:
  • Current employer and title (including clinical practicum experience):
  • Career goals (generally):
  • Research interests:
  • Group specialties/interests:
  • Current group research (if applicable):
  • Current groups leading (if applicable):
  • What are you looking for from a mentor?  If you are interested specifically in research collaboration with a mentee, please list that here.
  • Are you looking for a mentor involved primarily in practice or academia?
  • Do you have preferences about the stage of career of your mentor?  (If so, please list.)
  • Do you have any other preferences for your mentor?
Categories
Early Career Psychologists

Early Career Group Psychologist Column

Misha Bogomaz, Psy.D., C.G.P.
Misha Bogomaz, Psy.D., C.G.P.

Early Career Group Psychologist Column

I’m taking a chance here. Most of these reports from the ECP Task Force have been simply a report of our activity for the past six months. When I looked at the last one, I wondered, “How many people actually read it?” And if no one reads it, why am I writing? Perhaps this reveals to you more about me than I actually intend: my worry about wasted work, energy, and for my voice to be wasted.

I’ve asked myself, “What would I want to read if I was not a part of the Division 49 ECP Task Force? What would matter to me?” During my first APA Annual Meeting, I wanted to find my place within a large organization and feel like what I did mattered. My friend and I sat on a rooftop at APA in DC and talked with a senior psychologist. She was impressive! I loved her stories about the history of APA and it seemed like she was involved through it all. She talked about APA like it was her professional home for many decades and there would be nothing that stopped her from attending annual meetings.

When asked how she got so involved, she encouraged my friend and I to show up to meetings, volunteer for a project, and deliver on that promise. This is the advice I want to pass to other ECPs who are reading this column and wondering how to fit into APA and make their voice heard. Here I must confess, my fear is for my voice to not matter or to be irrelevant. I would like to have a say, no matter how small, in the events to come. Things might not work out the way I want, but I still want to have a voice in the process.

If you share my fear or have some other internal motivation to become involved, I say to you: “Show up to that meeting, volunteer for projects, and deliver.” It’s that easy.

Categories
Early Career Psychologists

Early Career Group Psychologist Column

Misha Bogomaz, Psy.D., C.G.P.
Misha Bogomaz, Psy.D., C.G.P.

Greetings from the Early Career Psychologist Task Force

In May 2017, we hosted a Community Conversation Hour event (CCH) focused on using creative interventions in group psychotherapy. We discussed using activities to increase group cohesion, address termination related issues, and deepening conversations. We continue to utilize ZOOM as our medium and record our events. If you are interested in catching up with us or listen to previous CCH events, please email us at div49group@gmail.com.

We are also looking to add two members who are interested in participating in the ECP Task Force. The main responsibility would be contributing articles for the Facebook page, helping to host Community Conversation Hours, and helping to organize the social hour at 2017 APA Annual Convention. Please don’t hesitate to contact us and check out our Facebook page!

Speaking of APA Annual Convention, our ECP group is in charge of coordinating the Division 49 social hour. We would love to hear requests on choosing the caterer or the type of food we want while in DC! Typically, the social hour features a drink that is popular to that region… email us a drink that you would love to have at the social! We’ll look forward to seeing many of you there.

Categories
Early Career Psychologists

Early Career Psychologist Task Force

Misha Bogomaz, Psy.D., C.G.P.
Misha Bogomaz, Psy.D., C.G.P.

Greetings from the Early Career Psychologist Task Force!

In the past six months we hosted two Community Conversation Hour events (CCH) focused on group psychotherapy in private practice. We discussed unique challenges facing us at private practice in terms of group member selection, billing, referrals, and group structure. We continue to utilize ZOOM as our medium and record our events. If you are interested in catching up with us or listen to previous CCH events, please email us at div49group@gmail.com.

We are also looking to add two members who are interested in participating in the ECP Task Force. The main responsibility would be contributing articles for the Facebook page, helping to host Community Conversation Hours, and helping to organize the social hour at 2017 APA Annual Convention. Please don’t hesitate to contact us and check out our Facebook page!

Categories
Early Career Psychologists

Early Career Group Psychologist Column

Misha Bogomaz, Psy.D., C.G.P.
Misha Bogomaz, Psy.D., C.G.P.

Greetings from the Early Career Psychologist Task Force! 

In the past six months, the ECP Task Force hosted two conference calls, one on co-leadership and one on salary negotiation tips. Both call were well attended, especially the one on salary negotiation which featured Dr. King from the University of North Florida Counseling Center. Starting in 2016, the Task Force is moving away from phone conference calls and is planning to use Zoom as the new medium for conference calls. The first presentation in 2016 will be Women in Leadership and is scheduled to take place on April 15 at 12:00 Eastern Time Zone. Stay tuned for registration details!

Another new change for the past year was for the ECP Task Force to host the social hour at the 2015 Annual Convention. Different kinds of wine, a featured cocktail, and Mediterranean food created a welcoming atmosphere for all of the attendees. Be sure to check out the APA 2016 social hour in Denver.

At the mid-winter Board meeting in February, it was decided that formal ECP representation on the board is critical. The board has decided to create an ECP Member-at-Large position that is specifically focused on the needs of early career psychologists. The elected person will be leading the Early Career Task force for three years. Stay tuned for 2016 elections and be sure to cast your vote!