Categories
Early Career Psychologists

Notes from the North: History of Experiential Groups in Canada

Kasra Khorsani, M.D.
Kasra Khorsani, M.D., President, CGPA

CGPA multi-centre Experiential Training Groups (ETG) are on Saturday May 13, 2017. This is the second annual ETG day run by CGPA. This was a very well received event in 2016, with 50 people who participated in five groups in Toronto, Winnipeg, and Calgary. This year Halifax and Vancouver have joined the program.

The day consists of two three-hour process groups divided by lunch. These groups offer an opportunity for therapists of all modalities to learn about group dynamics by participating as members of the ETGs. Transference and countertransference issues, intimacy, attachment, boundaries, group cohesion, and issues around termination are reflected upon by the members who are committed to examining their own process.  For more details please see http://cgpa.ca/may-experiential-training-group-intensive/

For over six decades, ETGs have been an important part of group psychotherapy training in Canada.  According to Dr. John Salvendy, these can be put in three categories. The first two categories are all trainee process groups and all trainee therapy groups. In both cases, members could be from the same program or from different programs. In these instances, the frequency could be one time, periodic, or continuous short- or long-term.  Finally, an all patient group that trainees could join have also been used in some programs as a requirement for training (3).

Initially, the training groups in Canada were based on the Tavistok group therapy model (which many experience as an anxiety provoking model). However, since the early ’80s the model applied has been a relational/interpersonal model. This shift has resulted in almost uniform positive assessment of ETGs by trainees (5).

The most prevalent training groups in academic centers are the training process groups. The members of the groups are trainees in the same programs and depending on the size of the program, members may or may not know each other in their professional settings.  The frequency of meeting varies from one time to multiple meetings for the duration of the program. The largest and longest running program in Canada was started in University of Toronto in 1977 and continues to be a successful once per year all day experiential group for the psychiatry residents. This is a very successful and well rated event by the participants. Seventy out of 140 residents attended the latest goup day which was a four and half-hour group experience divided in to a morning and an afternoon session (4,5).

The various non-university group psychotherapy training programs in Canada started in the mid 1960’s in Toronto (Ontario Group Psychotherapy Association), followed by programs in Montreal in early 70’s. With inception of CGPA in 1980, additional training programs were established across the country. These included ones in Calgary, Ottawa, and Winnipeg. The Toronto Group Psychotherapy Training Program operated from 1978 until 2008. They had twenty-four 90-minute experiential sessions led by three different group leaders over the two-year program. The present Toronto-based taining program, Toronto Institute of Group Studies, includes a 90-minute experiential component on each of the 12 days of the program (2). This highlights the variety of training experiences available, as the Calgary program required each trainee to have 90 hours of experiential training obtained either through an all trainees process group or joining a patient interpersonal group.

The CGPA May ETGs is a one-time process group, for mental health professionals (including trainees) from different professional backgrounds and from different settings. CGPA has had a noteworthy history of offering process groups for therapists (initially modeled after AGPA Institute groups).  CGPA’s first national conference (Banff Alberta, 1980) was exclusively experiential/process groups. Impressively, 160 therapists participated in 15 two-day training groups during this first conference (1).

CGPA has continued to offer ETGs in its annual conferences since then. From 1980 until 2007 the conference began with two days of process groups. More recently the experiential groups have been a day to day and half duration and offered at the end of the conference. Over the years, the experiential/process groups have been lead and monitored by exceptionally experienced group psychotherapists from across Canada.

With the start of the multicentre May ETG event now we offer this special training opportunity twice per year, once at the annual meeting in October and again in May at multiple centres simultaneously across Canada.

I would like to thank the following colleagues for their communications regarding this summary: John Salvendy, Molyn Leszcz, Allan Sheps, Joan-Dianne Smith, Anthony Joyce, Linda Goddard, and Eric Jackman.

References

  1. CGPA News Letter March 1981 vol. 1, No 1
  2. Joyce, Anthony S. Ph.D., Tasca, Giorgio A. Ph.D. & Ogrodniczuk, John S. Ph.D. (2015) Group Psychotherapy in Canada, International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 65:4, 583-593
  3. 3. Salvendy, John T.: Group Therapy Trainees as bona fide members in patient groups. Group and Family Therapy 1982, Brunner/Mazel, Inc., NY 1983, 166-181
  4. Salvendy, John T. M.D., Stewart, Mary F.: Periodic T-Groups for Psychiatric Residents, Journal of Psychiatric Education 7:4, 287-295
  5. Sunderji, Nadiya, M.D., Malat, Jan, M.D. Leszcz, Molyn, M.D. (2013) Group Day: Experiential Learning About Group Psychotherapy for Psychiatry Residents at University of Toronto, Academic Psychiatry 37(5):352-4.
Categories
Early Career Psychologists

Early Career Psychologist Task Force

Misha Bogomaz, Psy.D., C.G.P.
Misha Bogomaz, Psy.D., C.G.P.

Greetings from the Early Career Psychologist Task Force!

In the past six months we hosted two Community Conversation Hour events (CCH) focused on group psychotherapy in private practice. We discussed unique challenges facing us at private practice in terms of group member selection, billing, referrals, and group structure. We continue to utilize ZOOM as our medium and record our events. If you are interested in catching up with us or listen to previous CCH events, please email us at div49group@gmail.com.

We are also looking to add two members who are interested in participating in the ECP Task Force. The main responsibility would be contributing articles for the Facebook page, helping to host Community Conversation Hours, and helping to organize the social hour at 2017 APA Annual Convention. Please don’t hesitate to contact us and check out our Facebook page!

Categories
News

Tribute to Joseph P. Powers, Ph.D.

In Memoriam: Tributes to Joseph Patrick Powers

Phillip Speiser, PhD, LMHC

Group Psychotherapist Director

Arbour Counseling Services & Partial Hospitalization Program

Norwell, MA

Joe Powers, Ph.D
Joe Powers, Ph.D.

Dr. Joseph (Joe) Patrick Powers passed away on January 14, 2017, in his home in Needham MA. He lived with his wife Kathleen O’Brien and has two children, Devin and Cullan.

Joe was an active member of the Executive Board of Division 49 of the APA, where he recently helped pilot a new journal that focused on group practice and the practitioner. He was Director of Group Psychotherapy at the prestigious McLean Hospital in Belmont MA and was a ‘master’ group therapist. How does one become a ‘master’ at their art? We can trace this passion for the learning about ‘living, surviving and thriving’ in-group back to Joe’s formative years, growing up in the Bronx NY, as the second child of eight siblings. Born September 29, 1944 he spent much of his childhood playing stickball, basketball, handball, touch football and other sports on the streets and playgrounds in the community. In those days the neighborhood was safe and the streets became part of your extended family. Most neighbors knew each other and kept an eye out for each other. It didn’t matter much if you were Irish, Italian, Jewish or other ethnicity as long as you could ‘play ball’ and this he did. He excelled and thrived in this environment sowing seeds that touched on inclusion, fairness, and social networking. Joe then went on to study English Literature at Catholic University and then Communications at New York University. He would begin to integrate these studies and skills as he then proceeded to study Group Psychotherapy, Sociometry and Psychodrama with J.L. and Zerka Moreno in the early1970’s. The Moreno’s were early pioneers in the study of the group and have left us with many practical tools to work with and study groups, including: role play, role training, action methods, sociodrama, social atom and sociogram. Psychodrama dealt with the study of the individual within a group therapy setting through dramatic enactment- exploration. Joe quickly became a leader and trainer in this early, specialized field of study. It is at this time that I first met Joe and he became my mentor and teacher and later, friend and colleague. In 1975, Joe left NY for Boston to found the New England Psychodrama Institute with Peter Rowan. Together they also started a Psychodrama, Group Psychotherapy Master’s program at Lesley University. His passion for learning led him to continue his journey in the study of groups, as he went on to complete his doctorate at Harvard University and Boston College. It is from here he found his professional home at McLean Hospital as Director of Group Psychotherapy. For over three decades Joe continued to work as a ‘master’ group therapist, teacher, supervisor and researcher. He touched the lives of hundreds of clients, students and colleagues as he shared his wisdom and wonder for life. The ‘group’ became a second home, one filled with compassion, empathy, wonder and awe- a forum where lives could meet and find common ground as they moved towards healthy relationship and change. To quote from a family member: ‘His profound devotion to helping others find peace was surpassed only by the love he had for his family and dear friends and his capacity to see the beauty in this world.” Joe will always have a special place in our hearts and he will be greatly missed.

Categories
Columns

Prevention Corner

Elaine Clanton Harpine, Ph.D.
Elaine Clanton Harpine, Ph.D.

Prevention Corner

This will be my last prevention corner.  My husband and I are retiring in May.  I want to thank the Division 49 leadership and especially Tom and everyone who has worked on the newsletter for inviting me to write the Prevention Corner.  I hope that another group preventionist will take up the challenge and continued the column.  I look forward to reading the next person’s ideas.

Prevention groups play a very important role in group psychology.  In Division 49, we have the opportunity to draw group prevention into the division and expand the scope of Group Psychology.  As I stated in the February/March 2017 issue of the American Psychologist, “Why wasn’t prevention included?” All too often psychologist turn away and close the door on group prevention.  Prevention groups could offer and expand the outreach of group psychology.  There are many community organizations, schools, and health professionals seeking trained prevention group leaders (for a suggested list see Clanton Harpine, 2015).  As I have stated previously in this column (see July 26, vol 26, #2), there are many undergraduates who struggle to find adequate employment with a bachelor’s degree in psychology. Group prevention could provide these employment opportunities.  Group prevention should be incorporated into our undergraduate psychology degree programs because group prevention could offer career opportunities for students and new outreach possibilities in psychology (Clanton Harpine, 2017).  Group prevention is not a threat to group psychotherapy; therapy and prevention work with two totally different populations and needs.  As a division, we need both. Yet, all too often group prevention is shoved aside.  I hope as Division 49 continues to grow that the leadership will open the door and welcome group prevention as a full partner.

Thank you for my years and many friends in the division.  Even in retirement, I will continue at a slower pace to work with children who are struggling to learn to read.  The concern of psychologists over reading failure is growing.  Reading failure continues to be a major developmental psychological problem with at-risk students.  I will be continuing my reading blog for those who are interested, please feel free to contact me:  www.groupcentered.com   or at clantonharpine@hotmail.com

References

Clanton Harpine, E.  (2015).  Group-centered prevention in mental health:  Theory, training, and practice.  New York:  Springer.

Clanton Harpine, E.  (2017).  Why wasn’t prevention included?  Comment on the special issue on undergraduate education in psychology (2016).  American Psychologist, 72, 171-172.   doi:  10. 1037/amp 0000061

Categories
Columns

Diversity Committee

Joe Miles, Ph.D.

Recognizing Student and Professional Contributions to Diversity in Group Psychology and Group Psychotherapy

The Society of Group Psychology and Group Psychotherapy Diversity Committee is pleased to announce a new Student Award for Outstanding Contribution to Diversity in Group Psychology. This award is in addition to the Award for Outstanding Professional Contribution to Diversity in Group Psychology. Both awards may be given each year to qualified nominees. Information about both awards can be found below:

1. The Student Award for Outstanding Contribution to Diversity in Group Psychology or Group Psychotherapy

The Student Award for Outstanding Professional Contribution to Diversity in Group Psychology or Group Psychotherapy seeks to recognize excellence in group psychology practice, research, service, and/or advocacy with a focus on promoting understanding and respect for diversity.  All who are members of Division 49 (or whose application for membership is currently pending) are eligible. Nominations may come from self or others. The award will be presented at the annual American Psychological Association Convention. A $500.00 cash award and plaque will be presented to the award winner. Nominations materials should include and be limited to the following:

  • Names, phone numbers, program and institutional affiliations, APA divisional membership of yourself (the endorser) and of your nominee.
  • A brief letter highlighting your nominee’s contributions in promoting understanding and respect for diversity in group psychology practice, research, service and/or advocacy.
  • The nominee’s vita.
  • All materials should be submitted via a zipped/compressed folder in one email with the following subject line: [Candidate’s First and Last Name] –Application for Group Dynamics Teaching Award. For example, MARGARET WISE BROWN – APPLICATION FOR STUDENT DIVERSITY AWARD.zip.

All submissions must be received by May 1, 2017 to be considered. Send to division49awards@gmail.com

2. The Award for Outstanding Professional Contribution to Diversity in Group Psychology or Group Psychotherapy

The Award for Outstanding Professional Contribution to Diversity in Group Psychology or Group Psychotherapy started in 2012 and is awarded every year. This award honors psychologists who have made significant contributions to group psychology practice, research, service, and/or mentoring, with a focus on promoting understanding and respect for diversity.  All who are members of Division 49 (or whose application for membership is currently pending) are eligible. Nominations may come from self or others. The award will be presented at the annual American Psychological Association Convention. A $1,000.00 cash award and plaque will be presented to the award winner. Nominations materials should include and be limited to the following:

  • Names, phone numbers, program and institutional affiliations, APA divisional membership of yourself (the endorser) and of your nominee.
  • A brief letter highlighting the nominee’s contributions in promoting understanding and respect for diversity in group psychology practice, research, service and/or mentoring.
  • The nominee’s vita.
  • All materials should be submitted via a zipped/compressed folder in one email with the following subject line: [Candidate’s First and Last Name] –Application for Group Dynamics Teaching Award. For example, ERICA BLADE – APPLICATION FOR DIVERSITY AWARD.zip.

Self-nominations are accepted. Nominations are reviewed by the Diversity Committee and voted on by the board of directors at its midwinter meeting.

All submissions must be received by May 1, 2017 to be considered. Send to division49awards@gmail.com


Diversity Programming at APA in Washington, DC

The Diversity Committee would like to help highlight diversity-related programming at the 2017 APA Convention in Washington, DC this August. If you will be presenting on a topic related to diversity in group psychology or group psychotherapy, please let us know! You can send titles of your presentations to Joe Miles at joemiles@utk.edu.

In addition, the Diversity Committee is interested in developing a diversity-related program in the Division 49 Hospitality Suite at the Convention. This program could take the form of a conversation hour, mentoring session, or panel of speakers. Our goal is to foster dialogue among Division members about diversity in group psychology and group psychotherapy in an informal setting. We would like to hear from you about diversity-related topics or types of programming you would like to see in the Suite! Please email any ideas or requests to Joe Miles at joemiles@utk.edu.

Join the Diversity Committee!

Do you have a passion for diversity and social justice in group psychology or group psychotherapy? Consider joining the Diversity Committee! The committee was established in 2007 “to promote the inclusion and visibility of underrepresented minorities in the society. The committee is also charged with attracting, fostering, and managing diversity in membership and activities of the society, and developing and recommending policies and programs designed to educate members of the division in this area in their practice, research and training” (see: http://www.apadivisions.org/division-49/leadership/committees/index.aspx). If you are interested in learning more, please contact Joe Miles at joemiles@utk.edu.

Categories
Columns

Group Psychotherapy Column

Tevya Zukor, Ph.D.

A Call to Action

These are troubling, unsettling times.  The world is changing at a record pace and many of the bedrock principals that formed the United States of America seem to be more in question than ever before.  To quote the great Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade:

“It is time to ask yourself what you believe.”

Who are we as a society?  Who are we as a country?

At the most basic level, the question is always -Who are we as a Group? How do we want to define our values? How do we stand and support one another, even when we may have disparate thoughts and opinions? How do we identify as individuals who are also a member of a larger whole?

These are the questions that millions of Americans have been asking themselves in the recent days, weeks, and months. These are questions about values and identity. These are questions that shape who we truly are as people; and just as importantly, who we actually want to be.

These questions can be anxiety-provoking.  What happens when we look in the mirror and we don’t like the reflection that stares back at us? As with all potentially troubling questions; it is far scarier, and more isolating, when we try to answer them alone.

We feel better, and more secure, when we ask such questions and get feedback from others.  We benefit from perspectives that we often lose when fear takes hold. We take solace in knowing that even if the answers may sometimes be troubling or uncomfortable, we are stronger when we can lean on others and we are braver when we are part of a larger group.

As group practitioners, we know this to be true.  We have lived these experiences and we have directly beheld the power of group.  We have seen courage and witnessed bravery that would not have been possible if a person had attempted to do it alone. Our wisdom, derived from years of experience and education, allows us to understand these concepts both theoretically and practically. This is our area of expertise.

In the uncertain times that our nation now faces, we are needed more than ever.   We have experienced this journey, both personally and professionally, many times before. It is NOT new to us. It is NOT uncharted territory. Our livelihoods and passions have literally been organized around assisting people through the darkest times in their lives and allowing them to experience the immense strength they have that they never knew existed.  That is the work we do every single day. We know how to do this.  We walk this path with countless clients.

Now that the very fabric of our Republic feels like it is in jeopardy; our work does NOT change – just the scope of our practice does.  This is our call to be leaders (Or, in the parlance of our profession, “facilitators” if one so prefers). Our work is no longer contained to the clients who walk through our office doors.

Our profession is about serving the needs of people and right now, the people of the country are struggling. Most of us are used to working with small groups of 6-10 members. Now it’s time to serve the large group – possibly the largest of large groups – it’s time to serve ALL members of this great country.

We, as group mental health professionals, are uniquely qualified to meet the needs of the group right now. We have the training and experience to understand the dynamics of scapegoating, oppression, and irrational fear-based behavior. Not only do we understand how these processes emerge, but we have thousands of years of combined experience helping people navigate through the worst times of their lives and being there as they to emerge from the darkness that once overwhelmed them.

We know it is possible because we have experienced it countless times before.  We have worked with the desperate, despondent client who is convinced that the world will never change.  We have challenged the hopelessness of clients when they have told us that things will never get better and their lived will never improve. We understand that their fears are often based on a lack of knowledge and perspective. We teach and encourage coping skills even to those who are unconvinced it will be successful. And most importantly, we show our groups that they are stronger and more resilient than they ever knew possible.

This time is no different; it’s just more present and the scope is a bit bigger. It’s time to do what our years of training and experience has taught us to do – It’s time to lead the group.

Categories
Awards

Dissertation Award

Richard Moreland, Ph.D.
Richard Moreland, Ph.D.

Richard Moreland Dissertation of the Year Award

This award honors a recent dissertation by someone whose research on small groups is especially promising. The winner is announced and the prize is conferred at the annual American Psychological Association Convention. Included in the award are $1,000, a plaque, and a three-year membership in the division. Only dissertations that were completed during the prior calendar year are eligible, but the research described in those dissertations can explore any group phenomenon, using any methodology to investigate any type of group. A committee reviews all the abstracts and selects three finalists, who then submit complete copies of their dissertations for the committee’s evaluation.

A five-page, double-spaced abstract of your work should be sent to Richard Moreland, PhD, by Dec. 31 (every year).

Richard Moreland, PhD
Department of Psychology
3103 Sennott Square
University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh, PA. 15260

Categories
News

Professional Contributions Awards & Student Awards

2018 DISTINGUISHED PROFESSIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS AND STUDENT AWARDS 

CALL FOR NOMINATIONS

Deadline: June 1, 2017

APA’s Board of Professional Affairs (BPA) seeks nominations for its Distinguished Professional Contributions awards. All nominees must have excellent overall personal and professional reputations. Nominees should not have received disciplinary action from a state board of examiners in psychology and must have no history of ethical violations at the state or national level.

Winners receive an honorarium of $1,000; the opportunity to present an invited address at APA’s 2018 Annual Convention in San Francisco, CA, August 9-12, 2018; a waiver of 2018 convention registration fees; and reimbursement of up to $1,500 in expenses related to attendance at the 2018 convention.

For each award, nominators should provide a detailed narrative statement of no more than 300 words on the nature of the contributions and focus of the nomination and an up-to-date resume and bibliography. Endorsements from other individuals or groups are encouraged. Also, nominators of award winners will be responsible for preparing a 100-word award citation.

Note: Additional requirements for APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology

Please send nomination materials for all categories to Sheila Kerr-Wilson at skerr@apa.org. You may also reach her by phone at (202) 336-5878.

The APA Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Applied Research is given to a psychologist whose research has led to important discoveries or developments in the field of applied psychology. To be eligible, this research should have led to innovative applications in an area of psychological practice, including but not limited to assessment, consultation, instruction, or intervention (either direct or indirect). Research involving the original development of procedures, methodologies, or technical skills that significantly improve the application of psychological knowledge and provide direct and immediate solutions to practical problem areas will be considered, as will research that has informed psychologists on how better to observe, define, predict, or control behavior. Original integration of existing theories or knowledge is also eligible for consideration.

For additional information please visit: http://www.apa.org/about/awards/applied-research.aspx

The APA Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Independent Practice. The award is intended to recognize outstanding independent practitioners in psychology. Nominations will be considered for psychologists working in any area of clinical specialization, health services provision, or consulting, and services provided to any patient population or professional clientele in an independent setting. Services provided to diverse client groups or patient populations, including but not limited to children/adolescents/adults/older adults; urban/rural/frontier populations; minority populations; and persons with serious mental illness will be considered. Contributions may be judged distinguished by virtue of peer recognition, advancement of the public’s recognition of psychology as a profession, relevant professional association honors, or other meritorious accomplishments denoting excellence as a practitioner including advancement of the profession.

For additional information please visit: http://www.apa.org/about/awards/private-sector.aspx

The APA Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Institutional Practice. The award is intended to recognize outstanding practitioners in psychology. Nominations will be considered for psychologists working in a wide variety of institutional practice settings (e.g. schools, military, state hospital, Department of Veterans Affairs, etc.). Services provided to diverse client groups or patient populations, including but not limited to children/adolescents/adults/older adults; urban/rural/frontier populations; minority populations; and, persons with serious mental illness will be considered. Contributions may be judged distinguished by virtue of peer recognition, advancement of the public’s recognition of psychology as a profession, relevant professional association honors, or other meritorious accomplishments denoting excellence as a practitioner including improvement of institutional service delivery systems or development of psychologically informed public policy.

For additional information please visit: http://www.apa.org/about/awards/institutional-practice.aspx

APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology is awarded on an annual basis by BPA and the American Psychological Association of Graduate Students (APAGS) to a graduate student who has demonstrated outstanding practice and application of psychology. A qualified candidate must demonstrate exemplary performance in working with an underserved population in an applied setting or have developed an innovative method for delivering health services to an underserved population. Nominees may have received their doctoral degree at the time of nomination provided that accomplishments for the award were achieved while a graduate student. Eligible candidates are encouraged to apply from all psychology sub-specialties (e.g., clinical, counseling, organization, school, health) and can be self-nominated or nominated by an APA member. However, all self-nominations must be endorsed by an APA member who serves the function of a nominator.

Each applicant must submit a summary of no more than 1,000 words regarding their work with an underserved population that must include a description of the student’s work with this population, the status of the underserved population and number served, nature of psychological services/work done and its impact on addressing the needs of the identified population. In addition, nominees are expected to identify why the group they have worked with is considered underserved. Applicants must also submit a curriculum vitae, a letter of support from a member of APA and, in the instance of a self-nomination, verification that the endorser will serve the role and complete the functions of a nominator.

For additional information, including details regarding nomination material please visit: http://www.apa.org/about/awards/grad-profpsyc.aspx

Attention Nominators:

The nominator/endorser will be expected to prepare the text for the award citation, attend the APA Annual Convention (at his or her own expense), serve as chair of the winner’s award address, introduce the award recipient and prepare the written introduction for any APA publications wishing to publicize the award.

___________________________________________________________________

2018 American Psychological Foundation

Call For Nominations

Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Practice of Psychology

Deadline: June 1, 2017

The American Psychological Foundation (APF) invites nominations for the APF 2018 Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Practice of Psychology. The award includes a mounted medallion; a waiver of 2018 convention registration fees; round trip airfare; and a travel stipend of $1,000 to attend the 2018 American Psychological Association (APA) Annual Convention in San Francisco, California.

The Gold Medal Awards recognize life achievement in and enduring contributions to psychology.  Eligibility is limited to psychologists 65 years or older residing in North America.

Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Practice of Psychology recognizes a distinguished career and enduring contribution to advancing the professional practice of psychology.  This award is meant to honor colleagues whose career has focused on either the practice of psychology or advancing the practice of psychology.  (Submit nominations to Sheila Kerr-Wilson, skerr@apa.org)

Additional criteria may include:

Distinguished Service: Evidence of distinguished, sustained service in psychology.

Achievement of Excellence: Evidence of recognition by other professional/public interest groups of a kind not routinely accorded to all psychologists.  All nominees should have excellent overall personal and professional reputations.

Extraordinary Recognition: Evidence of having received national or international recognition from one’s colleagues for contributions to psychology.

Significant Contributions: The publication of articles, books, monographs and other scientific writings which have made a demonstrable impact on the science and thinking of colleagues on more than a local basis, in their field of endeavor.  Contributions may be judged distinguished by virtue of peer recognition, advancement of the public’s recognition of psychology as a profession, relevant professional association honors, or other meritorious accomplishments denoting excellence as a scientific researcher including advancement of the profession.

Nominees should not have received disciplinary action from a state board of examiners in psychology and must have no history of ethical violations at the state or national level.

Nomination Requirements:

Nomination letters should indicate the specific Gold Medal Award for which the individual is being nominated and should include the following:

  • Nomination statement that addresses the award criteria
  • Nominee’s current vita and bibliography
  • Letters in support of the nomination are welcome, but please refrain from sending supplementary materials such as videos, books, brochures, or magazines
  • All nomination materials should be coordinated and collected by a chief nominator and submitted in one package by email to the appropriate APA staff member listed with that award.
Categories
News

Div49 APA Convention Program Co-Chairs

The Division 49 Convention Committee looks forward to seeing everyone at the upcoming APA Annual Convention in Washington, DC on August 3-6, 2017. We have an exciting program planned for the convention; please look for upcoming emails from the Convention Co-Chairs with more details this summer!  Programs will be listed in the June issue of The Group Psychologist.

Martin Kivlighan, Ph.D.
Martin Kivlighan, Ph.D.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Debra O'Connell, Ph.D.
Debra O’Connell, Ph.D.
Categories
Elections

Division 49 Candidates

The division 49 candidates and election results will be distributed on the Division 49 list serve when available and the results will also appear in the October issue of The Group Psychologist.